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Coexisting mantle cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma.

Rajput AB, Burns B, Gerridzen R, van der Jagt R - Case Rep Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Prostatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a very rare entity with only 5 reported cases in the literature.We report a case of coexisting MCL and prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) in an elderly male and review the morphologic features of classic and rare prostatic MCL subtypes.Careful morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemical findings of positive CD5, CD20, and cyclin D1 and negative CD23 and CD3 can guide us to the diagnosis of MCL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematopathology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association and The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Hematopathology and Transfusion Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.

ABSTRACT
Prostatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a very rare entity with only 5 reported cases in the literature. We report a case of coexisting MCL and prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) in an elderly male and review the morphologic features of classic and rare prostatic MCL subtypes. Careful morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemical findings of positive CD5, CD20, and cyclin D1 and negative CD23 and CD3 can guide us to the diagnosis of MCL. Given the fact that transurethral resection of prostate is done quite routinely, this paper draws attention to the manner in which long standing bladder outlet obstruction and postbiopsy prostate specimens with dense lymphoid infiltration can masquerade as lymphoma. It highlights the importance of exercising care while reviewing prostate specimens with evidence of chronic prostatitis so as not to miss this rare neoplasm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3), 20x hematoxylin and eosin. (b) Normal glands have intact basal layer stained dark brown with CK 5/6. Cancer tissue lacks basal layer and luminal glands show finely granular pink cytoplasmic stain, 20x PIN4 cocktail.
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fig1: (a) Prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3), 20x hematoxylin and eosin. (b) Normal glands have intact basal layer stained dark brown with CK 5/6. Cancer tissue lacks basal layer and luminal glands show finely granular pink cytoplasmic stain, 20x PIN4 cocktail.

Mentions: In light of increased PSA levels and prostatic enlargement, core needle biopsy of the prostate was performed in November 2013. It showed adenocarcinoma (acinar, not otherwise specified) involving left base of the gland (Figure 1(a)) with a Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3). There was no evidence of seminal vesicle, lymphatic, or perineural invasion. Immunohistochemical staining with triple stain PIN4 cocktail comprising of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and CK 5/6 confirmed areas of PCa and delineated the normal prostate glands. Normal glands with intact basal layer showed dark brown nuclear stain and absent AMACR staining. The PCa areas showed cytoplasmic red finely granular staining pattern and absence of basal layer (Figure 1(b)).


Coexisting mantle cell lymphoma and prostate adenocarcinoma.

Rajput AB, Burns B, Gerridzen R, van der Jagt R - Case Rep Med (2014)

(a) Prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3), 20x hematoxylin and eosin. (b) Normal glands have intact basal layer stained dark brown with CK 5/6. Cancer tissue lacks basal layer and luminal glands show finely granular pink cytoplasmic stain, 20x PIN4 cocktail.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216672&req=5

fig1: (a) Prostate adenocarcinoma Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3), 20x hematoxylin and eosin. (b) Normal glands have intact basal layer stained dark brown with CK 5/6. Cancer tissue lacks basal layer and luminal glands show finely granular pink cytoplasmic stain, 20x PIN4 cocktail.
Mentions: In light of increased PSA levels and prostatic enlargement, core needle biopsy of the prostate was performed in November 2013. It showed adenocarcinoma (acinar, not otherwise specified) involving left base of the gland (Figure 1(a)) with a Gleason grade 6 (3 + 3). There was no evidence of seminal vesicle, lymphatic, or perineural invasion. Immunohistochemical staining with triple stain PIN4 cocktail comprising of alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), p63, and CK 5/6 confirmed areas of PCa and delineated the normal prostate glands. Normal glands with intact basal layer showed dark brown nuclear stain and absent AMACR staining. The PCa areas showed cytoplasmic red finely granular staining pattern and absence of basal layer (Figure 1(b)).

Bottom Line: Prostatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a very rare entity with only 5 reported cases in the literature.We report a case of coexisting MCL and prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) in an elderly male and review the morphologic features of classic and rare prostatic MCL subtypes.Careful morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemical findings of positive CD5, CD20, and cyclin D1 and negative CD23 and CD3 can guide us to the diagnosis of MCL.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematopathology, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association and The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6 ; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Hematopathology and Transfusion Medicine, The Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.

ABSTRACT
Prostatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a very rare entity with only 5 reported cases in the literature. We report a case of coexisting MCL and prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) in an elderly male and review the morphologic features of classic and rare prostatic MCL subtypes. Careful morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemical findings of positive CD5, CD20, and cyclin D1 and negative CD23 and CD3 can guide us to the diagnosis of MCL. Given the fact that transurethral resection of prostate is done quite routinely, this paper draws attention to the manner in which long standing bladder outlet obstruction and postbiopsy prostate specimens with dense lymphoid infiltration can masquerade as lymphoma. It highlights the importance of exercising care while reviewing prostate specimens with evidence of chronic prostatitis so as not to miss this rare neoplasm.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus