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Conservatively managed spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a patient with chronic bladder outflow obstruction.

Jones AL, Armitage JN, Kastner C - Urol Ann (2014)

Bottom Line: We present the unusual case of a spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder rupture as a first presentation of chronic bladder outflow obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia.A contributing factor to diagnostic delay was unfamiliarity with the classical presentation of abdominal pain, abdominal distension and urinary ascites leading to autodialysis represented by an unusually high serum creatinine.The patient's initial acute presentation was successfully managed conservatively with prolonged urinary catheterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present the unusual case of a spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder rupture as a first presentation of chronic bladder outflow obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. A contributing factor to diagnostic delay was unfamiliarity with the classical presentation of abdominal pain, abdominal distension and urinary ascites leading to autodialysis represented by an unusually high serum creatinine. A cystogram was performed after a non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan originally performed to determine the cause of abdominal pain, failed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient's initial acute presentation was successfully managed conservatively with prolonged urinary catheterization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A retrograde cystogram revealing leakage of contrast into the peritoneum confirming an intraperitoneal bladder rupture
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Figure 3: A retrograde cystogram revealing leakage of contrast into the peritoneum confirming an intraperitoneal bladder rupture

Mentions: His admission NCCT images were reviewed once more with the radiologists, who believed that the integrity of the bladder was sound [Figure 2]. However, due to remaining clinical uncertainties, a retrograde cystogram was performed which clearly demonstrated an intraperitoneal bladder perforation [Figure 3] and this was confirmed on subsequent CT [Figure 4].


Conservatively managed spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder perforation in a patient with chronic bladder outflow obstruction.

Jones AL, Armitage JN, Kastner C - Urol Ann (2014)

A retrograde cystogram revealing leakage of contrast into the peritoneum confirming an intraperitoneal bladder rupture
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216550&req=5

Figure 3: A retrograde cystogram revealing leakage of contrast into the peritoneum confirming an intraperitoneal bladder rupture
Mentions: His admission NCCT images were reviewed once more with the radiologists, who believed that the integrity of the bladder was sound [Figure 2]. However, due to remaining clinical uncertainties, a retrograde cystogram was performed which clearly demonstrated an intraperitoneal bladder perforation [Figure 3] and this was confirmed on subsequent CT [Figure 4].

Bottom Line: We present the unusual case of a spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder rupture as a first presentation of chronic bladder outflow obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia.A contributing factor to diagnostic delay was unfamiliarity with the classical presentation of abdominal pain, abdominal distension and urinary ascites leading to autodialysis represented by an unusually high serum creatinine.The patient's initial acute presentation was successfully managed conservatively with prolonged urinary catheterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK.

ABSTRACT
We present the unusual case of a spontaneous intraperitoneal bladder rupture as a first presentation of chronic bladder outflow obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. A contributing factor to diagnostic delay was unfamiliarity with the classical presentation of abdominal pain, abdominal distension and urinary ascites leading to autodialysis represented by an unusually high serum creatinine. A cystogram was performed after a non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scan originally performed to determine the cause of abdominal pain, failed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient's initial acute presentation was successfully managed conservatively with prolonged urinary catheterization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus