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Engineering a Robust Photovoltaic Device with Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin.

Renugopalakrishnan V, Barbiellini B, King C, Molinari M, Mochalov K, Sukhanova A, Nabiev I, Fojan P, Tuller HL, Chin M, Somasundaran P, Padrós E, Ramakrishna S - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

Bottom Line: This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies.It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale.This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University , 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02138, United States.

ABSTRACT
We present a route toward a radical improvement in solar cell efficiency using resonant energy transfer and sensitization of semiconductor metal oxides with a light-harvesting quantum dot (QD)/bacteriorhodopsin (bR) layer designed by protein engineering. The specific aims of our approach are (1) controlled engineering of highly ordered bR/QD complexes; (2) replacement of the liquid electrolyte by a thin layer of gold; (3) highly oriented deposition of bR/QD complexes on a gold layer; and (4) use of the Forster resonance energy transfer coupling between bR and QDs to achieve an efficient absorbing layer for dye-sensitized solar cells. This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies. It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale. This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels.

No MeSH data available.


(a)Planar structure of the solid-state photovoltaic device. (b) Illustrationof a nanowire array showing the conductive core, covered, respectively,by TiO2 (or ZnO) semiconductor metal oxides, Au, and QD-bRdye layers. Panel c illustrates how the nanowire array can be packagedto include a lower transparent electrode, a transparent polymer matrixto provide mechanical stability and flexibility, and a top reflectiveelectrode. The polymer matrix can include particles with index ofrefraction differing from the matrix to further enhance internal reflections.
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fig1: (a)Planar structure of the solid-state photovoltaic device. (b) Illustrationof a nanowire array showing the conductive core, covered, respectively,by TiO2 (or ZnO) semiconductor metal oxides, Au, and QD-bRdye layers. Panel c illustrates how the nanowire array can be packagedto include a lower transparent electrode, a transparent polymer matrixto provide mechanical stability and flexibility, and a top reflectiveelectrode. The polymer matrix can include particles with index ofrefraction differing from the matrix to further enhance internal reflections.

Mentions: Atthe heart of every photovoltaic device is a mechanism for photon-to-electricaltransduction. Ideally, the device should capture light across a broadspectrum and efficiently transfer the energy of photons to the electrons.Current dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) designs1−3 have achievedefficiencies of over 10% but make use of expensive, toxic compounds(e.g., Ru-based dyes) and comprise a reactive liquid electrolyte,leading to potential sealing and aging/degradation problems of thesolar panels. In 2003, McFarland and Tang proposed a design shownin Figure 1, which removes the need for theliquid electrolyte,4 although an inefficientabsorbing layer remained as a component of their system, keeping theefficiency at the 1% level.


Engineering a Robust Photovoltaic Device with Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin.

Renugopalakrishnan V, Barbiellini B, King C, Molinari M, Mochalov K, Sukhanova A, Nabiev I, Fojan P, Tuller HL, Chin M, Somasundaran P, Padrós E, Ramakrishna S - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

(a)Planar structure of the solid-state photovoltaic device. (b) Illustrationof a nanowire array showing the conductive core, covered, respectively,by TiO2 (or ZnO) semiconductor metal oxides, Au, and QD-bRdye layers. Panel c illustrates how the nanowire array can be packagedto include a lower transparent electrode, a transparent polymer matrixto provide mechanical stability and flexibility, and a top reflectiveelectrode. The polymer matrix can include particles with index ofrefraction differing from the matrix to further enhance internal reflections.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216200&req=5

fig1: (a)Planar structure of the solid-state photovoltaic device. (b) Illustrationof a nanowire array showing the conductive core, covered, respectively,by TiO2 (or ZnO) semiconductor metal oxides, Au, and QD-bRdye layers. Panel c illustrates how the nanowire array can be packagedto include a lower transparent electrode, a transparent polymer matrixto provide mechanical stability and flexibility, and a top reflectiveelectrode. The polymer matrix can include particles with index ofrefraction differing from the matrix to further enhance internal reflections.
Mentions: Atthe heart of every photovoltaic device is a mechanism for photon-to-electricaltransduction. Ideally, the device should capture light across a broadspectrum and efficiently transfer the energy of photons to the electrons.Current dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) designs1−3 have achievedefficiencies of over 10% but make use of expensive, toxic compounds(e.g., Ru-based dyes) and comprise a reactive liquid electrolyte,leading to potential sealing and aging/degradation problems of thesolar panels. In 2003, McFarland and Tang proposed a design shownin Figure 1, which removes the need for theliquid electrolyte,4 although an inefficientabsorbing layer remained as a component of their system, keeping theefficiency at the 1% level.

Bottom Line: This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies.It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale.This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School , 4 Blackfan Circle, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, United States ; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University , 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02138, United States.

ABSTRACT
We present a route toward a radical improvement in solar cell efficiency using resonant energy transfer and sensitization of semiconductor metal oxides with a light-harvesting quantum dot (QD)/bacteriorhodopsin (bR) layer designed by protein engineering. The specific aims of our approach are (1) controlled engineering of highly ordered bR/QD complexes; (2) replacement of the liquid electrolyte by a thin layer of gold; (3) highly oriented deposition of bR/QD complexes on a gold layer; and (4) use of the Forster resonance energy transfer coupling between bR and QDs to achieve an efficient absorbing layer for dye-sensitized solar cells. This proposed approach is based on the unique optical characteristics of QDs, on the photovoltaic properties of bR, and on state-of-the-art nanobioengineering technologies. It permits spatial and optical coupling together with control of hybrid material components on the bionanoscale. This method paves the way to the development of the solid-state photovoltaic device with the efficiency increased to practical levels.

No MeSH data available.