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Clinical use of a cordless laparoscopic ultrasonic device.

Kim FJ, Sehrt D, Molina WR, Pompeo A - JSLS (2014 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: The surgical technician successfully assembled the device at the beginning of the cases with verbal instructions from the surgeon.Surgical staff satisfaction survey results revealed easier and faster assembly, more space in the operating room, ergonomic handle, and comparable cutting/coagulation, weight, and plume generation with other devices (Table 1). [Table: see text].The first clinical application of the pioneering cordless dissector was successfully performed, resulting in surgeons' perceptions of comparable results with other devices of easier and safer use and faster assembly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO.

ABSTRACT

Objective: On April 25, 2012, the first laparoscopic cordless ultrasonic device (Sonicision, Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts) was used in a clinical setting. We describe our initial experience.

Methods: The cordless device is assembled with a reusable battery and generator on a base hand-piece. It has a minimum and maximum power setting controlled by a single trigger for both coagulation and cutting. A laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed on a 56-year-old man with a 7-cm right renal mass. A laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed in a 51-year-old man with high-risk prostate cancer. Data on surgical team satisfaction, operative time, number of activations, and times the laparoscope was removed as a result of plume were collected.

Results: The surgical technician successfully assembled the device at the beginning of the cases with verbal instructions from the surgeon. Operative time for nephrectomy was 77 minutes, with 143 total activations (minimum = 86, maximum = 57). The operative time for the pelvic lymphadenectomy was 27 minutes, with 38 total activations (minimum = 27, maximum = 11). One battery was used in each case. The laparoscope was removed twice during the nephrectomy and once during the lymphadenectomy. Surgical staff satisfaction survey results revealed easier and faster assembly, more space in the operating room, ergonomic handle, and comparable cutting/coagulation, weight, and plume generation with other devices (Table 1). [Table: see text].

Conclusion: The first clinical application of the pioneering cordless dissector was successfully performed, resulting in surgeons' perceptions of comparable results with other devices of easier and safer use and faster assembly.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Use of the cordless ultrasonic dissector.
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Figure 2: Use of the cordless ultrasonic dissector.

Mentions: The SCUD is a cordless energy-based dissector designed for laparoscopic surgery. It operates similarly to conventional dissectors but with a number of innovations. The SCUD is assembled with a reusable battery and generator on a base hand-piece (Figure 1). The assembly may be performed autonomously and in the sterile surgical field. The instrument requires a quick systems check of the minimum and maximum mode before each use. The instrument has a 39-cm shaft length with a 5-mm diameter. It is activated by a dual-mode energy button, which is pressed to the first level for the low-power setting (coagulation) and to the second level for the full-power setting (cutting). Feedback for each level is proved with distinct audible tones produced by the SCUD. This activation method contrasts with conventional ultrasonic dissectors, which use either a 2-button hand trigger or a foot-pedal system (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The power of the SCUD is driven by a battery pack that also functions as part of the handle of the instrument. The battery packs are rated to last for an entire surgery; however, it is recommended that a back-up battery remain available. The device indicates the power level through a series of lights on the generator. A green light means the system is ready. A yellow light on the instrument is generated when there is 20% battery power remaining. A red light indicates that the battery needs to be charged. The charger enables 4 batteries to be charged simultaneously, and each battery can be fully charged within 2 hours.


Clinical use of a cordless laparoscopic ultrasonic device.

Kim FJ, Sehrt D, Molina WR, Pompeo A - JSLS (2014 Jul-Sep)

Use of the cordless ultrasonic dissector.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216175&req=5

Figure 2: Use of the cordless ultrasonic dissector.
Mentions: The SCUD is a cordless energy-based dissector designed for laparoscopic surgery. It operates similarly to conventional dissectors but with a number of innovations. The SCUD is assembled with a reusable battery and generator on a base hand-piece (Figure 1). The assembly may be performed autonomously and in the sterile surgical field. The instrument requires a quick systems check of the minimum and maximum mode before each use. The instrument has a 39-cm shaft length with a 5-mm diameter. It is activated by a dual-mode energy button, which is pressed to the first level for the low-power setting (coagulation) and to the second level for the full-power setting (cutting). Feedback for each level is proved with distinct audible tones produced by the SCUD. This activation method contrasts with conventional ultrasonic dissectors, which use either a 2-button hand trigger or a foot-pedal system (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The power of the SCUD is driven by a battery pack that also functions as part of the handle of the instrument. The battery packs are rated to last for an entire surgery; however, it is recommended that a back-up battery remain available. The device indicates the power level through a series of lights on the generator. A green light means the system is ready. A yellow light on the instrument is generated when there is 20% battery power remaining. A red light indicates that the battery needs to be charged. The charger enables 4 batteries to be charged simultaneously, and each battery can be fully charged within 2 hours.

Bottom Line: The surgical technician successfully assembled the device at the beginning of the cases with verbal instructions from the surgeon.Surgical staff satisfaction survey results revealed easier and faster assembly, more space in the operating room, ergonomic handle, and comparable cutting/coagulation, weight, and plume generation with other devices (Table 1). [Table: see text].The first clinical application of the pioneering cordless dissector was successfully performed, resulting in surgeons' perceptions of comparable results with other devices of easier and safer use and faster assembly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Denver Health Medical Center, Denver, CO.

ABSTRACT

Objective: On April 25, 2012, the first laparoscopic cordless ultrasonic device (Sonicision, Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts) was used in a clinical setting. We describe our initial experience.

Methods: The cordless device is assembled with a reusable battery and generator on a base hand-piece. It has a minimum and maximum power setting controlled by a single trigger for both coagulation and cutting. A laparoscopic radical nephrectomy was performed on a 56-year-old man with a 7-cm right renal mass. A laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed in a 51-year-old man with high-risk prostate cancer. Data on surgical team satisfaction, operative time, number of activations, and times the laparoscope was removed as a result of plume were collected.

Results: The surgical technician successfully assembled the device at the beginning of the cases with verbal instructions from the surgeon. Operative time for nephrectomy was 77 minutes, with 143 total activations (minimum = 86, maximum = 57). The operative time for the pelvic lymphadenectomy was 27 minutes, with 38 total activations (minimum = 27, maximum = 11). One battery was used in each case. The laparoscope was removed twice during the nephrectomy and once during the lymphadenectomy. Surgical staff satisfaction survey results revealed easier and faster assembly, more space in the operating room, ergonomic handle, and comparable cutting/coagulation, weight, and plume generation with other devices (Table 1). [Table: see text].

Conclusion: The first clinical application of the pioneering cordless dissector was successfully performed, resulting in surgeons' perceptions of comparable results with other devices of easier and safer use and faster assembly.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus