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Effect of temperature pre-exposure on the locomotion and chemotaxis of C. elegans.

Parida L, Neogi S, Padmanabhan V - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The effect of pre-exposure was observed to be persistent for about 20 minutes after which the behavior (including velocity and CI) appeared to be comparable to that of control animals (maintained at 20 °C).Surprisingly, after 30 minutes of recovery, the behavior of C. elegans continued to deteriorate further below that of control worms with a drastic reduction in the curvature of the worms' body.A majority of these worms also showed negative chemotaxis index indicating a loss in their chemotaxis ability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT
The effect of temperature pre-exposure on locomotion and chemotaxis of the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively studied. The behavior of C. elegans was quantified using a simple harmonic curvature-based model. Animals showed increased levels of activity, compared to control worms, immediately after pre-exposure to 30 °C. This high level of activity in C. elegans translated into frequent turns by making 'complex' shapes, higher velocity of locomotion, and higher chemotaxis index (CI) in presence of a gradient of chemoattractant. The effect of pre-exposure was observed to be persistent for about 20 minutes after which the behavior (including velocity and CI) appeared to be comparable to that of control animals (maintained at 20 °C). Surprisingly, after 30 minutes of recovery, the behavior of C. elegans continued to deteriorate further below that of control worms with a drastic reduction in the curvature of the worms' body. A majority of these worms also showed negative chemotaxis index indicating a loss in their chemotaxis ability.

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Various shapes of crawling C. elegans.The corresponding model representations are shown as white lines along the backbone of worms. The experimental images were obtained at 20°C on 2 wt% agar. The ratio  for all the shapes are also shown.
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pone-0111342-g002: Various shapes of crawling C. elegans.The corresponding model representations are shown as white lines along the backbone of worms. The experimental images were obtained at 20°C on 2 wt% agar. The ratio for all the shapes are also shown.

Mentions: The behavior of C. elegans can be quantified by analyzing the shape of their body during crawling motion. In general, it is known that C. elegans travel forward by making undulatory movements along the length of their body and make sharp turns by curving their body such that it resembles an omega or a loop shape. The level of activity in C. elegans can be directly associated with the number of sharp turns they make in a given time as it requires the animal to increase its instantaneous velocity to accomplish such a turn [16]. We analyzed and compared the shapes of pre-exposed and control animals using the curvature-based model, described in the Materials and Methods section, to extract the parameters, and for the curvature of the worm's body. Fig. 2 shows the various shapes C. elegans make in absence of food. The corresponding values are also shown. The values of curvature parameters, and are dimensionless as fitting was done on the normalized skeleton data. we note that it is possible to classify the worm body shapes as ‘regular’ (where the animals exhibit a sine-shaped curve) when and ‘complex’ (omega, loops, etc.) when .


Effect of temperature pre-exposure on the locomotion and chemotaxis of C. elegans.

Parida L, Neogi S, Padmanabhan V - PLoS ONE (2014)

Various shapes of crawling C. elegans.The corresponding model representations are shown as white lines along the backbone of worms. The experimental images were obtained at 20°C on 2 wt% agar. The ratio  for all the shapes are also shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216088&req=5

pone-0111342-g002: Various shapes of crawling C. elegans.The corresponding model representations are shown as white lines along the backbone of worms. The experimental images were obtained at 20°C on 2 wt% agar. The ratio for all the shapes are also shown.
Mentions: The behavior of C. elegans can be quantified by analyzing the shape of their body during crawling motion. In general, it is known that C. elegans travel forward by making undulatory movements along the length of their body and make sharp turns by curving their body such that it resembles an omega or a loop shape. The level of activity in C. elegans can be directly associated with the number of sharp turns they make in a given time as it requires the animal to increase its instantaneous velocity to accomplish such a turn [16]. We analyzed and compared the shapes of pre-exposed and control animals using the curvature-based model, described in the Materials and Methods section, to extract the parameters, and for the curvature of the worm's body. Fig. 2 shows the various shapes C. elegans make in absence of food. The corresponding values are also shown. The values of curvature parameters, and are dimensionless as fitting was done on the normalized skeleton data. we note that it is possible to classify the worm body shapes as ‘regular’ (where the animals exhibit a sine-shaped curve) when and ‘complex’ (omega, loops, etc.) when .

Bottom Line: The effect of pre-exposure was observed to be persistent for about 20 minutes after which the behavior (including velocity and CI) appeared to be comparable to that of control animals (maintained at 20 °C).Surprisingly, after 30 minutes of recovery, the behavior of C. elegans continued to deteriorate further below that of control worms with a drastic reduction in the curvature of the worms' body.A majority of these worms also showed negative chemotaxis index indicating a loss in their chemotaxis ability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India.

ABSTRACT
The effect of temperature pre-exposure on locomotion and chemotaxis of the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been extensively studied. The behavior of C. elegans was quantified using a simple harmonic curvature-based model. Animals showed increased levels of activity, compared to control worms, immediately after pre-exposure to 30 °C. This high level of activity in C. elegans translated into frequent turns by making 'complex' shapes, higher velocity of locomotion, and higher chemotaxis index (CI) in presence of a gradient of chemoattractant. The effect of pre-exposure was observed to be persistent for about 20 minutes after which the behavior (including velocity and CI) appeared to be comparable to that of control animals (maintained at 20 °C). Surprisingly, after 30 minutes of recovery, the behavior of C. elegans continued to deteriorate further below that of control worms with a drastic reduction in the curvature of the worms' body. A majority of these worms also showed negative chemotaxis index indicating a loss in their chemotaxis ability.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus