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Mining cancer-specific disease comorbidities from a large observational health database.

Chen Y, Xu R - Cancer Inform (2014)

Bottom Line: We stratified 3,354,043 patients based on age and gender, and developed a network-based approach to extract comorbidity patterns from each patient group.We applied our comorbidity mining approach on colorectal cancer and detected its comorbid associations with metabolic syndrome components, diabetes, and osteoporosis.Our results not only confirmed known cancer comorbidities but also generated novel hypotheses, which can illuminate the common pathophysiology between cancers and their co-occurring diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Informatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cancer comorbidities often reflect the complex pathogenesis of cancers and provide valuable clues to discover the underlying genetic mechanisms of cancers. In this study, we systematically mine and analyze cancer-specific comorbidity from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. We stratified 3,354,043 patients based on age and gender, and developed a network-based approach to extract comorbidity patterns from each patient group. We compared the comorbidity patterns among different patient groups and investigated the effect of age and gender on cancer comorbidity patterns. The results demonstrated that the comorbidity relationships between cancers and non-cancer diseases largely depend on age and gender. A few exceptions are depression, anxiety, and metabolic syndrome, whose comorbidity relationships with cancers are relatively stable among all patients. Literature evidences demonstrate that these stable cancer comorbidities reflect the pathogenesis of cancers. We applied our comorbidity mining approach on colorectal cancer and detected its comorbid associations with metabolic syndrome components, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Our results not only confirmed known cancer comorbidities but also generated novel hypotheses, which can illuminate the common pathophysiology between cancers and their co-occurring diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comorbidity relationships between endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders and cancers among five patient groups with different age levels.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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f6-cin-suppl.1-2014-037: Comorbidity relationships between endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders and cancers among five patient groups with different age levels.

Mentions: We repeated the same analysis on 16 endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders. In most age groups, particularly patients older than 20 years, cancers frequently co-occur with metabolic syndrome components, such as hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipidemia; endocrine system diseases, such as hypothyroidism and hypokalemia; and diabetes mellitus (Fig. 6). Their cancer comorbidity patterns are independent of patient gender. Literature evidences show that several factors can explain the observed comorbidity between metabolic disorders and cancers. First, environment factors contribute to the disease comorbidity relationship. Previous studies show that metabolic disorders increase the risk of cancers, and the patients share similar lifestyles, such as high fat dietary and few exercises, with cancer patients.40,41 Second, common molecular mechanisms also play roles in explaining the disease comorbidity relationship. It was also demonstrated that insulin resistance, which contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, has associations with colon cancer.42,43 In addition, osteoporosis tends to occur among elderly cancer patients (Fig. 6). Researches on the link between osteoporosis and breast cancer show that elderly cancer patients are more likely to have lower estrogens, which has a protective effect on bone, and reduced the risk of bone loss.44


Mining cancer-specific disease comorbidities from a large observational health database.

Chen Y, Xu R - Cancer Inform (2014)

Comorbidity relationships between endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders and cancers among five patient groups with different age levels.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216041&req=5

f6-cin-suppl.1-2014-037: Comorbidity relationships between endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders and cancers among five patient groups with different age levels.
Mentions: We repeated the same analysis on 16 endocrine, nutritional, and metabolic disorders. In most age groups, particularly patients older than 20 years, cancers frequently co-occur with metabolic syndrome components, such as hypercholesterolemia and hyperlipidemia; endocrine system diseases, such as hypothyroidism and hypokalemia; and diabetes mellitus (Fig. 6). Their cancer comorbidity patterns are independent of patient gender. Literature evidences show that several factors can explain the observed comorbidity between metabolic disorders and cancers. First, environment factors contribute to the disease comorbidity relationship. Previous studies show that metabolic disorders increase the risk of cancers, and the patients share similar lifestyles, such as high fat dietary and few exercises, with cancer patients.40,41 Second, common molecular mechanisms also play roles in explaining the disease comorbidity relationship. It was also demonstrated that insulin resistance, which contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, has associations with colon cancer.42,43 In addition, osteoporosis tends to occur among elderly cancer patients (Fig. 6). Researches on the link between osteoporosis and breast cancer show that elderly cancer patients are more likely to have lower estrogens, which has a protective effect on bone, and reduced the risk of bone loss.44

Bottom Line: We stratified 3,354,043 patients based on age and gender, and developed a network-based approach to extract comorbidity patterns from each patient group.We applied our comorbidity mining approach on colorectal cancer and detected its comorbid associations with metabolic syndrome components, diabetes, and osteoporosis.Our results not only confirmed known cancer comorbidities but also generated novel hypotheses, which can illuminate the common pathophysiology between cancers and their co-occurring diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Medical Informatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

ABSTRACT
Cancer comorbidities often reflect the complex pathogenesis of cancers and provide valuable clues to discover the underlying genetic mechanisms of cancers. In this study, we systematically mine and analyze cancer-specific comorbidity from the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System. We stratified 3,354,043 patients based on age and gender, and developed a network-based approach to extract comorbidity patterns from each patient group. We compared the comorbidity patterns among different patient groups and investigated the effect of age and gender on cancer comorbidity patterns. The results demonstrated that the comorbidity relationships between cancers and non-cancer diseases largely depend on age and gender. A few exceptions are depression, anxiety, and metabolic syndrome, whose comorbidity relationships with cancers are relatively stable among all patients. Literature evidences demonstrate that these stable cancer comorbidities reflect the pathogenesis of cancers. We applied our comorbidity mining approach on colorectal cancer and detected its comorbid associations with metabolic syndrome components, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Our results not only confirmed known cancer comorbidities but also generated novel hypotheses, which can illuminate the common pathophysiology between cancers and their co-occurring diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus