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Diagnosis and management of food allergies: new and emerging options: a systematic review.

O'Keefe AW, De Schryver S, Mill J, Mill C, Dery A, Ben-Shoshan M - J Asthma Allergy (2014)

Bottom Line: It is reported that 6% of children and 3% of adults have food allergies, with studies suggesting increased prevalence worldwide over the last few decades.While the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, this assessment is resource intensive and impractical in most clinical situations.Management of food allergies typically involves allergen avoidance and carrying an epinephrine autoinjector.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada ; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT
It is reported that 6% of children and 3% of adults have food allergies, with studies suggesting increased prevalence worldwide over the last few decades. Despite this, our diagnostic capabilities and techniques for managing patients with food allergies remain limited. We have conducted a systematic review of literature published within the last 5 years on the diagnosis and management of food allergies. While the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, this assessment is resource intensive and impractical in most clinical situations. In an effort to reduce the need for the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, several risk-stratifying tests are employed, namely skin prick testing, measurement of serum-specific immunoglobulin E levels, component testing, and open food challenges. Management of food allergies typically involves allergen avoidance and carrying an epinephrine autoinjector. Clinical research trials of oral immunotherapy for some foods, including peanut, milk, egg, and peach, are under way. While oral immunotherapy is promising, its readiness for clinical application is controversial. In this review, we assess the latest studies published on the above diagnostic and management modalities, as well as novel strategies in the diagnosis and management of food allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of the database search for literature about food allergy diagnosis and management.
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f1-jaa-7-141: Results of the database search for literature about food allergy diagnosis and management.

Mentions: We searched the PubMed database for scientific literature published between January 13, 2009 and January 13, 2014 using the following search criteria: “food allergy” AND “management” OR “diagnosis”. We used the following filters in our search: clinical trial, abstract available, and studies done on humans in any language. Of the available articles, we selected those that were relevant to this review based on the abstract. A team of six readers then further reviewed these articles. The articles have been summarized in regard to food allergy diagnosis and management in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Upon initial search of PubMed using the above terms, 12,139 titles appeared. After applying the filters as described, 217 titles remained. Once abstracts had been reviewed, 100 articles were warranted for inclusion in the study (Figure 1).


Diagnosis and management of food allergies: new and emerging options: a systematic review.

O'Keefe AW, De Schryver S, Mill J, Mill C, Dery A, Ben-Shoshan M - J Asthma Allergy (2014)

Results of the database search for literature about food allergy diagnosis and management.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216032&req=5

f1-jaa-7-141: Results of the database search for literature about food allergy diagnosis and management.
Mentions: We searched the PubMed database for scientific literature published between January 13, 2009 and January 13, 2014 using the following search criteria: “food allergy” AND “management” OR “diagnosis”. We used the following filters in our search: clinical trial, abstract available, and studies done on humans in any language. Of the available articles, we selected those that were relevant to this review based on the abstract. A team of six readers then further reviewed these articles. The articles have been summarized in regard to food allergy diagnosis and management in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. Upon initial search of PubMed using the above terms, 12,139 titles appeared. After applying the filters as described, 217 titles remained. Once abstracts had been reviewed, 100 articles were warranted for inclusion in the study (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: It is reported that 6% of children and 3% of adults have food allergies, with studies suggesting increased prevalence worldwide over the last few decades.While the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, this assessment is resource intensive and impractical in most clinical situations.Management of food allergies typically involves allergen avoidance and carrying an epinephrine autoinjector.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada ; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, Canada.

ABSTRACT
It is reported that 6% of children and 3% of adults have food allergies, with studies suggesting increased prevalence worldwide over the last few decades. Despite this, our diagnostic capabilities and techniques for managing patients with food allergies remain limited. We have conducted a systematic review of literature published within the last 5 years on the diagnosis and management of food allergies. While the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, this assessment is resource intensive and impractical in most clinical situations. In an effort to reduce the need for the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, several risk-stratifying tests are employed, namely skin prick testing, measurement of serum-specific immunoglobulin E levels, component testing, and open food challenges. Management of food allergies typically involves allergen avoidance and carrying an epinephrine autoinjector. Clinical research trials of oral immunotherapy for some foods, including peanut, milk, egg, and peach, are under way. While oral immunotherapy is promising, its readiness for clinical application is controversial. In this review, we assess the latest studies published on the above diagnostic and management modalities, as well as novel strategies in the diagnosis and management of food allergy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus