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An economic model to compare linezolid and vancomycin for the treatment of confirmed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia in Germany.

Patel DA, Michel A, Stephens J, Weber B, Petrik C, Charbonneau C - Infect Drug Resist (2014)

Bottom Line: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin), with marginally lower costs (by €123) and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA NP).Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.The model results show that linezolid is a cost-effective alternative to vancomycin for MRSA-confirmed NP, largely attributable to the higher clinical response rate of patients treated with linezolid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Economic and Outcomes Research, Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Across Europe, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is considered to be the primary cause of nosocomial pneumonia (NP). In Germany alone, approximately 14,000 cases of MRSA-associated NP occur annually, which may have a significant impact on health care resource use and associated economic costs. The objective of this study was to investigate the economic impact of linezolid compared with that of vancomycin in the treatment of hospitalized patients with MRSA-confirmed NP in the German health care system.

Methods: A 4-week decision tree model incorporated published data and expert opinion on clinical parameters, resource use, and costs (2012 euros) was constructed. The base case first-line treatment duration for patients with MRSA-confirmed NP was 10 days. Treatment success (survival), failure due to lack of efficacy, serious adverse events, and mortality were possible outcomes that could impact costs. Alternate scenarios were analyzed, such as varying treatment duration (7 or 14 days) or treatment switch due to a serious adverse event/treatment failure (at day 5 or 10).

Results: The model calculated total base case inpatient costs of €15,116 for linezolid and €15,239 for vancomycin. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin), with marginally lower costs (by €123) and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA NP). Approximately 85%-87% of the total treatment costs were attributed to hospital stay (primarily in the intensive care unit). Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.

Conclusion: The model results show that linezolid is a cost-effective alternative to vancomycin for MRSA-confirmed NP, largely attributable to the higher clinical response rate of patients treated with linezolid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Decision model tree.Note: Dotted borders indicate that the possible outcomes for those treatments are similar to the outcomes above them with solid borders.Abbreviations: AE, adverse event; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; NP, nosocomial pneumonia.
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f1-idr-7-273: Decision model tree.Note: Dotted borders indicate that the possible outcomes for those treatments are similar to the outcomes above them with solid borders.Abbreviations: AE, adverse event; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; NP, nosocomial pneumonia.

Mentions: A 4-week decision tree model captured first-line and second-line therapy for patients with MRSA-confirmed NP (Figure 1). This time horizon is typically sufficient to capture intensive care unit (ICU) and general ward stay during first-line and second-line treatment, since first-line and second-line therapies are recommended to be used for up to 14 days each and a previous analysis estimated an average hospital length of stay for MRSA NP of 18–20 days.22


An economic model to compare linezolid and vancomycin for the treatment of confirmed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia in Germany.

Patel DA, Michel A, Stephens J, Weber B, Petrik C, Charbonneau C - Infect Drug Resist (2014)

Decision model tree.Note: Dotted borders indicate that the possible outcomes for those treatments are similar to the outcomes above them with solid borders.Abbreviations: AE, adverse event; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; NP, nosocomial pneumonia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4216023&req=5

f1-idr-7-273: Decision model tree.Note: Dotted borders indicate that the possible outcomes for those treatments are similar to the outcomes above them with solid borders.Abbreviations: AE, adverse event; MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; NP, nosocomial pneumonia.
Mentions: A 4-week decision tree model captured first-line and second-line therapy for patients with MRSA-confirmed NP (Figure 1). This time horizon is typically sufficient to capture intensive care unit (ICU) and general ward stay during first-line and second-line treatment, since first-line and second-line therapies are recommended to be used for up to 14 days each and a previous analysis estimated an average hospital length of stay for MRSA NP of 18–20 days.22

Bottom Line: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin), with marginally lower costs (by €123) and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA NP).Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.The model results show that linezolid is a cost-effective alternative to vancomycin for MRSA-confirmed NP, largely attributable to the higher clinical response rate of patients treated with linezolid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Economic and Outcomes Research, Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Across Europe, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is considered to be the primary cause of nosocomial pneumonia (NP). In Germany alone, approximately 14,000 cases of MRSA-associated NP occur annually, which may have a significant impact on health care resource use and associated economic costs. The objective of this study was to investigate the economic impact of linezolid compared with that of vancomycin in the treatment of hospitalized patients with MRSA-confirmed NP in the German health care system.

Methods: A 4-week decision tree model incorporated published data and expert opinion on clinical parameters, resource use, and costs (2012 euros) was constructed. The base case first-line treatment duration for patients with MRSA-confirmed NP was 10 days. Treatment success (survival), failure due to lack of efficacy, serious adverse events, and mortality were possible outcomes that could impact costs. Alternate scenarios were analyzed, such as varying treatment duration (7 or 14 days) or treatment switch due to a serious adverse event/treatment failure (at day 5 or 10).

Results: The model calculated total base case inpatient costs of €15,116 for linezolid and €15,239 for vancomycin. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin), with marginally lower costs (by €123) and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA NP). Approximately 85%-87% of the total treatment costs were attributed to hospital stay (primarily in the intensive care unit). Sensitivity analysis yielded similar results.

Conclusion: The model results show that linezolid is a cost-effective alternative to vancomycin for MRSA-confirmed NP, largely attributable to the higher clinical response rate of patients treated with linezolid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus