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Bacterial etiologies of five core syndromes: laboratory-based syndromic surveillance conducted in Guangxi, China.

Dong B, Liang D, Lin M, Wang M, Zeng J, Liao H, Zhou L, Huang J, Wei X, Zou G, Jing H - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients.In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention.Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Response, Guagnxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Health Bureau, Nanning, Guangxi, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Under the existing national surveillance system in China for selected infectious diseases, bacterial cultures are performed for only a small percentage of reported cases. We set up a laboratory-based syndromic surveillance system to elucidate bacterial etiologic spectrum and detect infection by rare etiologies (or serogroups) for five core syndromes in the given study area.

Methods: Patients presenting with one of five core syndromes at nine sentinel hospitals in Guagnxi, China were evaluated using laboratory-based syndrome surveillance to elucidate bacterial etiologies. We collected respiratory and stool specimens, as well as CSF, blood and other related samples for bacterial cultures and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assays.

Results: From February 2009 to December 2011, 2,964 patients were enrolled in the study. Etiologies were identified in 320 (10.08%) patients. Streptococcus pneumonia (37 strains, 24.18%), Klebsiella pneumonia (34, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) were the most frequent pathogens for fever and respiratory syndrome, while Salmonella (77, 81.05%) was most often seen in diarrhea syndrome cases. Salmonella paratyphi A (38, 86.36%) occurred in fever and rash syndrome, with Cryptococcus neoformans (20, 35.09%), Streptococcus pneumonia (5, 8.77%), Klebsiella pneumonia (5, 8.77%),streptococcus suis (3, 5.26%) and Neisseria meningitides group B (2, 3.51%) being the most frequently detected in encephalitis-meningitis syndrome. To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients.

Conclusions: In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention. Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area.

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Etiological distribution of fever and respiratory syndrome in Guangxi, China, 2009–2011.Of 153 etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes: Streptococcus pneumonia(SP, 37 strains), Haemophilus influenza(HI,18), Klebsiella pneumonia(KP,34), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA,19), Escherichia coli(EC, 10), Staphylococcus aureus(SA,8), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(SM,5), β-hemolytic streptococcus(βHS,4), Serratia marcescens(SeM,3), Enterobacter cloacae(EnC,2), Staphylococcus hominis(SH,1), Staphylococcus saprophyticus(SS,1), Acinetobacter baumannii (AB,1), Proteus(Pr,1), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA,1), Acinetobacter lwoffii(AL,1), Chryseobacterium meningosepticum(CM,1), Ochrobactrum anthropic(OA,1), Pseudomonas fluorescens(PF,1), Burkholderia cepacia(BC,1), Candida albicans(CA,2), Candida tropicalis(CT,1).
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pone-0110876-g002: Etiological distribution of fever and respiratory syndrome in Guangxi, China, 2009–2011.Of 153 etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes: Streptococcus pneumonia(SP, 37 strains), Haemophilus influenza(HI,18), Klebsiella pneumonia(KP,34), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA,19), Escherichia coli(EC, 10), Staphylococcus aureus(SA,8), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(SM,5), β-hemolytic streptococcus(βHS,4), Serratia marcescens(SeM,3), Enterobacter cloacae(EnC,2), Staphylococcus hominis(SH,1), Staphylococcus saprophyticus(SS,1), Acinetobacter baumannii (AB,1), Proteus(Pr,1), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA,1), Acinetobacter lwoffii(AL,1), Chryseobacterium meningosepticum(CM,1), Ochrobactrum anthropic(OA,1), Pseudomonas fluorescens(PF,1), Burkholderia cepacia(BC,1), Candida albicans(CA,2), Candida tropicalis(CT,1).

Mentions: Of 153 (43.84%) etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes, pathogenic bacteria, opportunistic pathogens and fungus accounted for 35.95%, 62.09% and 1.96%, respectively. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Streptococcus pneumonia (37, 24.18%), followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (34 strains, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) (Figure 2).


Bacterial etiologies of five core syndromes: laboratory-based syndromic surveillance conducted in Guangxi, China.

Dong B, Liang D, Lin M, Wang M, Zeng J, Liao H, Zhou L, Huang J, Wei X, Zou G, Jing H - PLoS ONE (2014)

Etiological distribution of fever and respiratory syndrome in Guangxi, China, 2009–2011.Of 153 etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes: Streptococcus pneumonia(SP, 37 strains), Haemophilus influenza(HI,18), Klebsiella pneumonia(KP,34), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA,19), Escherichia coli(EC, 10), Staphylococcus aureus(SA,8), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(SM,5), β-hemolytic streptococcus(βHS,4), Serratia marcescens(SeM,3), Enterobacter cloacae(EnC,2), Staphylococcus hominis(SH,1), Staphylococcus saprophyticus(SS,1), Acinetobacter baumannii (AB,1), Proteus(Pr,1), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA,1), Acinetobacter lwoffii(AL,1), Chryseobacterium meningosepticum(CM,1), Ochrobactrum anthropic(OA,1), Pseudomonas fluorescens(PF,1), Burkholderia cepacia(BC,1), Candida albicans(CA,2), Candida tropicalis(CT,1).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215986&req=5

pone-0110876-g002: Etiological distribution of fever and respiratory syndrome in Guangxi, China, 2009–2011.Of 153 etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes: Streptococcus pneumonia(SP, 37 strains), Haemophilus influenza(HI,18), Klebsiella pneumonia(KP,34), Pseudomonas aeruginosa(PA,19), Escherichia coli(EC, 10), Staphylococcus aureus(SA,8), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia(SM,5), β-hemolytic streptococcus(βHS,4), Serratia marcescens(SeM,3), Enterobacter cloacae(EnC,2), Staphylococcus hominis(SH,1), Staphylococcus saprophyticus(SS,1), Acinetobacter baumannii (AB,1), Proteus(Pr,1), Enterobacter aerogenes (EA,1), Acinetobacter lwoffii(AL,1), Chryseobacterium meningosepticum(CM,1), Ochrobactrum anthropic(OA,1), Pseudomonas fluorescens(PF,1), Burkholderia cepacia(BC,1), Candida albicans(CA,2), Candida tropicalis(CT,1).
Mentions: Of 153 (43.84%) etiologies cultured from specimens of fever and respiratory syndromes, pathogenic bacteria, opportunistic pathogens and fungus accounted for 35.95%, 62.09% and 1.96%, respectively. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Streptococcus pneumonia (37, 24.18%), followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (34 strains, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients.In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention.Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Response, Guagnxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Health Bureau, Nanning, Guangxi, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Under the existing national surveillance system in China for selected infectious diseases, bacterial cultures are performed for only a small percentage of reported cases. We set up a laboratory-based syndromic surveillance system to elucidate bacterial etiologic spectrum and detect infection by rare etiologies (or serogroups) for five core syndromes in the given study area.

Methods: Patients presenting with one of five core syndromes at nine sentinel hospitals in Guagnxi, China were evaluated using laboratory-based syndrome surveillance to elucidate bacterial etiologies. We collected respiratory and stool specimens, as well as CSF, blood and other related samples for bacterial cultures and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assays.

Results: From February 2009 to December 2011, 2,964 patients were enrolled in the study. Etiologies were identified in 320 (10.08%) patients. Streptococcus pneumonia (37 strains, 24.18%), Klebsiella pneumonia (34, 22.22%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (19, 12.42%) and Haemophilus influenza (18, 11.76%) were the most frequent pathogens for fever and respiratory syndrome, while Salmonella (77, 81.05%) was most often seen in diarrhea syndrome cases. Salmonella paratyphi A (38, 86.36%) occurred in fever and rash syndrome, with Cryptococcus neoformans (20, 35.09%), Streptococcus pneumonia (5, 8.77%), Klebsiella pneumonia (5, 8.77%),streptococcus suis (3, 5.26%) and Neisseria meningitides group B (2, 3.51%) being the most frequently detected in encephalitis-meningitis syndrome. To date no pathogen was isolated from the specimens from fever and hemorrhage patients.

Conclusions: In addition to common bacterial pathogens, opportunistic pathogens and fungal infections require more attention. Our study contributes to the strengthening of the existing national surveillance system and provides references for other regions that are similar to the study area.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus