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Viral etiology of respiratory tract infections in children at the pediatric hospital in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).

Ouédraogo S, Traoré B, Nene Bi ZA, Yonli FT, Kima D, Bonané P, Congo L, Traoré RO, Yé D, Marguet C, Plantier JC, Vabret A, Gueudin M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Rhinoviruses/enteroviruses were most frequently detected (rhinovirus n = 88; enterovirus n = 38) and were found to circulate throughout the year.This study, the first of its type in Burkina Faso, warrants further investigation to confirm the seasonality of RSV infection and to improve local diagnosis of influenza.The long-term objective is to optimize therapeutic management of infected children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charles de Gaulle Pediatric University Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in Africa. The circulation of viruses classically implicated in ARIs is poorly known in Burkina Faso. The aim of this study was to identify the respiratory viruses present in children admitted to or consulting at the pediatric hospital in Ouagadougou.

Methods: From July 2010 to July 2011, we tested nasal aspirates of 209 children with upper or lower respiratory infection for main respiratory viruses (respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), metapneumovirus, adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses 1, 2 and 3, influenza A, B and C, rhinovirus/enterovirus), by immunofluorescence locally in Ouagadougou, and by PCR in France. Bacteria have also been investigated in 97 samples.

Results: 153 children (73.2%) carried at least one virus and 175 viruses were detected. Rhinoviruses/enteroviruses were most frequently detected (rhinovirus n = 88; enterovirus n = 38) and were found to circulate throughout the year. An epidemic of RSV infections (n = 25) was identified in September/October, followed by an epidemic of influenza virus (n = 13), mostly H1N1pdm09. This epidemic occurred during the period of the year in which nighttime temperatures and humidity were at their lowest. Other viruses tested were detected only sporadically. Twenty-two viral co-infections were observed. Bacteria were detected in 29/97 samples with 22 viral/bacterial co-infections.

Conclusions: This study, the first of its type in Burkina Faso, warrants further investigation to confirm the seasonality of RSV infection and to improve local diagnosis of influenza. The long-term objective is to optimize therapeutic management of infected children.

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Progression of the epidemics of RSV and influenza virus infections related to temperature and relative humidity values recorded at 6 AM and 12 noon.
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pone-0110435-g002: Progression of the epidemics of RSV and influenza virus infections related to temperature and relative humidity values recorded at 6 AM and 12 noon.

Mentions: An effect of climate has often been put forward as an explanation for the circulation patterns of respiratory viruses. A comparison of our findings for influenza and RSV with the available climatic data (Figure 2) showed that the influenza epidemic coincided with the period in which nighttime temperature (p = 0.0007) and relative humidity (p = 0.0343) were lowest. No significant climatic data were related to RSV epidemic.


Viral etiology of respiratory tract infections in children at the pediatric hospital in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso).

Ouédraogo S, Traoré B, Nene Bi ZA, Yonli FT, Kima D, Bonané P, Congo L, Traoré RO, Yé D, Marguet C, Plantier JC, Vabret A, Gueudin M - PLoS ONE (2014)

Progression of the epidemics of RSV and influenza virus infections related to temperature and relative humidity values recorded at 6 AM and 12 noon.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215928&req=5

pone-0110435-g002: Progression of the epidemics of RSV and influenza virus infections related to temperature and relative humidity values recorded at 6 AM and 12 noon.
Mentions: An effect of climate has often been put forward as an explanation for the circulation patterns of respiratory viruses. A comparison of our findings for influenza and RSV with the available climatic data (Figure 2) showed that the influenza epidemic coincided with the period in which nighttime temperature (p = 0.0007) and relative humidity (p = 0.0343) were lowest. No significant climatic data were related to RSV epidemic.

Bottom Line: Rhinoviruses/enteroviruses were most frequently detected (rhinovirus n = 88; enterovirus n = 38) and were found to circulate throughout the year.This study, the first of its type in Burkina Faso, warrants further investigation to confirm the seasonality of RSV infection and to improve local diagnosis of influenza.The long-term objective is to optimize therapeutic management of infected children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Charles de Gaulle Pediatric University Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

ABSTRACT

Background: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in Africa. The circulation of viruses classically implicated in ARIs is poorly known in Burkina Faso. The aim of this study was to identify the respiratory viruses present in children admitted to or consulting at the pediatric hospital in Ouagadougou.

Methods: From July 2010 to July 2011, we tested nasal aspirates of 209 children with upper or lower respiratory infection for main respiratory viruses (respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), metapneumovirus, adenovirus, parainfluenza viruses 1, 2 and 3, influenza A, B and C, rhinovirus/enterovirus), by immunofluorescence locally in Ouagadougou, and by PCR in France. Bacteria have also been investigated in 97 samples.

Results: 153 children (73.2%) carried at least one virus and 175 viruses were detected. Rhinoviruses/enteroviruses were most frequently detected (rhinovirus n = 88; enterovirus n = 38) and were found to circulate throughout the year. An epidemic of RSV infections (n = 25) was identified in September/October, followed by an epidemic of influenza virus (n = 13), mostly H1N1pdm09. This epidemic occurred during the period of the year in which nighttime temperatures and humidity were at their lowest. Other viruses tested were detected only sporadically. Twenty-two viral co-infections were observed. Bacteria were detected in 29/97 samples with 22 viral/bacterial co-infections.

Conclusions: This study, the first of its type in Burkina Faso, warrants further investigation to confirm the seasonality of RSV infection and to improve local diagnosis of influenza. The long-term objective is to optimize therapeutic management of infected children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus