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Action possibility judgments of people with varying motor abilities due to spinal cord injury.

Manson GA, Sayenko DG, Masani K, Goodman R, Wong L, Popovic MR, Tremblay L, Welsh TN - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Participants also performed the task.However, there were no between-group differences in judged MTs for the young adult.Although it is unclear how the judgments were adjusted (altered simulation vs. threshold modification), the data reveal that people with different motor capabilities due to SCI are not completely biased by their present capabilities and can effectively adjust their judgments to estimate the actions of others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Predictions about one's own action capabilities as well as the action capabilities of others are thought to be based on a simulation process involving linked perceptual and motor networks. Given the central role of motor experience in the formation of these networks, one's present motor capabilities are thought to be the basis of their perceptual judgments about actions. However, it remains unknown whether the ability to form these action possibility judgments is affected by performance related changes in the motor system. To determine if judgments of action capabilities are affected by long-term changes in one's own motor capabilities, participants with different degrees of upper-limb function due to their level (cervical vs. below cervical) of spinal cord injury (SCI) were tested on a perceptual-motor judgment task. Participants observed apparent motion videos of reciprocal aiming movements with varying levels of difficulty. For each movement, participants determined the shortest movement time (MT) at which they themselves and a young adult could perform the task while maintaining accuracy. Participants also performed the task. Analyses of MTs revealed that perceptual judgments for participant's own movement capabilities were consistent with their actual performance- people with cervical SCI had longer judged and actual MTs than people with below cervical SCI. However, there were no between-group differences in judged MTs for the young adult. Although it is unclear how the judgments were adjusted (altered simulation vs. threshold modification), the data reveal that people with different motor capabilities due to SCI are not completely biased by their present capabilities and can effectively adjust their judgments to estimate the actions of others.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Right/Left images and sequence of events used for the apparent motion stimuli during the action perception task.The first arrow indicates that the first image was of the model with their finger on the right target and that it was followed by the image with model's finger on the left target presented after the specific SOA for that trial. The two-way arrow indicates that the images were alternately presented until the the enter key was pressed.
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pone-0110250-g001: Right/Left images and sequence of events used for the apparent motion stimuli during the action perception task.The first arrow indicates that the first image was of the model with their finger on the right target and that it was followed by the image with model's finger on the left target presented after the specific SOA for that trial. The two-way arrow indicates that the images were alternately presented until the the enter key was pressed.

Mentions: The stimuli for the action possibility judgment task were photographs of an adult male sitting in front of posters with the index finger of the right hand placed in the middle of one of two targets. Two photos, one with the finger on the right target and one with the finger on the left target, were taken for each poster board. The two pictures were alternated to create an apparent motion of the model moving the finger between the two targets (see Figure 1). The same pairs of pictures were displayed throughout a single trial so that the ID was consistent within a trial. The time between the presentations of the two pictures (the stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA]) served as the apparent MT for the judgment tasks.


Action possibility judgments of people with varying motor abilities due to spinal cord injury.

Manson GA, Sayenko DG, Masani K, Goodman R, Wong L, Popovic MR, Tremblay L, Welsh TN - PLoS ONE (2014)

Right/Left images and sequence of events used for the apparent motion stimuli during the action perception task.The first arrow indicates that the first image was of the model with their finger on the right target and that it was followed by the image with model's finger on the left target presented after the specific SOA for that trial. The two-way arrow indicates that the images were alternately presented until the the enter key was pressed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215910&req=5

pone-0110250-g001: Right/Left images and sequence of events used for the apparent motion stimuli during the action perception task.The first arrow indicates that the first image was of the model with their finger on the right target and that it was followed by the image with model's finger on the left target presented after the specific SOA for that trial. The two-way arrow indicates that the images were alternately presented until the the enter key was pressed.
Mentions: The stimuli for the action possibility judgment task were photographs of an adult male sitting in front of posters with the index finger of the right hand placed in the middle of one of two targets. Two photos, one with the finger on the right target and one with the finger on the left target, were taken for each poster board. The two pictures were alternated to create an apparent motion of the model moving the finger between the two targets (see Figure 1). The same pairs of pictures were displayed throughout a single trial so that the ID was consistent within a trial. The time between the presentations of the two pictures (the stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA]) served as the apparent MT for the judgment tasks.

Bottom Line: Participants also performed the task.However, there were no between-group differences in judged MTs for the young adult.Although it is unclear how the judgments were adjusted (altered simulation vs. threshold modification), the data reveal that people with different motor capabilities due to SCI are not completely biased by their present capabilities and can effectively adjust their judgments to estimate the actions of others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Centre for Motor Control, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Predictions about one's own action capabilities as well as the action capabilities of others are thought to be based on a simulation process involving linked perceptual and motor networks. Given the central role of motor experience in the formation of these networks, one's present motor capabilities are thought to be the basis of their perceptual judgments about actions. However, it remains unknown whether the ability to form these action possibility judgments is affected by performance related changes in the motor system. To determine if judgments of action capabilities are affected by long-term changes in one's own motor capabilities, participants with different degrees of upper-limb function due to their level (cervical vs. below cervical) of spinal cord injury (SCI) were tested on a perceptual-motor judgment task. Participants observed apparent motion videos of reciprocal aiming movements with varying levels of difficulty. For each movement, participants determined the shortest movement time (MT) at which they themselves and a young adult could perform the task while maintaining accuracy. Participants also performed the task. Analyses of MTs revealed that perceptual judgments for participant's own movement capabilities were consistent with their actual performance- people with cervical SCI had longer judged and actual MTs than people with below cervical SCI. However, there were no between-group differences in judged MTs for the young adult. Although it is unclear how the judgments were adjusted (altered simulation vs. threshold modification), the data reveal that people with different motor capabilities due to SCI are not completely biased by their present capabilities and can effectively adjust their judgments to estimate the actions of others.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus