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Proteomics indicators of the rapidly shifting physiology from whole mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults during early host colonization.

Pitt C, Robert JA, Bonnett TR, Keeling CI, Bohlmann J, Huber DP - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones as well as motor proteins.Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding.The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We developed proteome profiles for host colonizing mountain pine beetle adults, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Adult insects were fed in pairs on fresh host lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud, phloem tissue. The proteomes of fed individuals were monitored using iTRAQ and compared to those of starved beetles, revealing 757 and 739 expressed proteins in females and males, respectively, for which quantitative information was obtained. Overall functional category distributions were similar for males and females, with the majority of proteins falling under carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle), structure (cuticle, muscle, cytoskeleton), and protein and amino acid metabolism. Females had 23 proteins with levels that changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones and enzymes required for vitellogenesis. In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones as well as motor proteins. Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding. Proteins with differential accumulation patterns in females exhibited higher fold changes with feeding than did those in males. This difference may be due to major and rapid physiological changes occurring in females upon finding a host tree during the physiological shift from dispersal to reproduction. The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization. The females' activation of vitellogenin only after encountering a host indicates deliberate partitioning of resources and a balancing of the needs of dispersal and reproduction.

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General functional proportions of all proteins.Detected proteins were divided into generalized functional groups based on gene ontology information from UNIprot.
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pone-0110673-g001: General functional proportions of all proteins.Detected proteins were divided into generalized functional groups based on gene ontology information from UNIprot.

Mentions: All proteins were assigned to general functional categories using annotations provided by NCBI BLASTx and UNIprotKB (Figure 1). Besides those with unknown designations, the functional categories containing the most proteins were carbohydrate metabolism (11.6% in females, 11.8% in males; including enzymes involved in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the citric acid cycle), structure (11.1% in females, 10.7% in males; proteins related to the cuticle, muscle, and cytoskeleton), protein and amino acid metabolism (10.3% in females, 9.7% in males), translation (9.9% in females and 10.6% in males; including ribosomal components and elongation factors), and signaling (7.9% in females, 8.3% in males; including enzymes affiliated with mediating cellular differentiation and development). In spite of the fact that only 61–63% of detected proteins were shared between the sexes, general proportions of proteins present in the functional groups differed little between females and males, perhaps suggesting common sources of precursors are being used for differing purposes.


Proteomics indicators of the rapidly shifting physiology from whole mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), adults during early host colonization.

Pitt C, Robert JA, Bonnett TR, Keeling CI, Bohlmann J, Huber DP - PLoS ONE (2014)

General functional proportions of all proteins.Detected proteins were divided into generalized functional groups based on gene ontology information from UNIprot.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215907&req=5

pone-0110673-g001: General functional proportions of all proteins.Detected proteins were divided into generalized functional groups based on gene ontology information from UNIprot.
Mentions: All proteins were assigned to general functional categories using annotations provided by NCBI BLASTx and UNIprotKB (Figure 1). Besides those with unknown designations, the functional categories containing the most proteins were carbohydrate metabolism (11.6% in females, 11.8% in males; including enzymes involved in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the citric acid cycle), structure (11.1% in females, 10.7% in males; proteins related to the cuticle, muscle, and cytoskeleton), protein and amino acid metabolism (10.3% in females, 9.7% in males), translation (9.9% in females and 10.6% in males; including ribosomal components and elongation factors), and signaling (7.9% in females, 8.3% in males; including enzymes affiliated with mediating cellular differentiation and development). In spite of the fact that only 61–63% of detected proteins were shared between the sexes, general proportions of proteins present in the functional groups differed little between females and males, perhaps suggesting common sources of precursors are being used for differing purposes.

Bottom Line: In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones as well as motor proteins.Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding.The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC, Canada.

ABSTRACT
We developed proteome profiles for host colonizing mountain pine beetle adults, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Adult insects were fed in pairs on fresh host lodgepole pine, Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud, phloem tissue. The proteomes of fed individuals were monitored using iTRAQ and compared to those of starved beetles, revealing 757 and 739 expressed proteins in females and males, respectively, for which quantitative information was obtained. Overall functional category distributions were similar for males and females, with the majority of proteins falling under carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, citric acid cycle), structure (cuticle, muscle, cytoskeleton), and protein and amino acid metabolism. Females had 23 proteins with levels that changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones and enzymes required for vitellogenesis. In males, levels of 29 proteins changed significantly with feeding (p<0.05, FDR<0.20), including chaperones as well as motor proteins. Only two proteins, both chaperones, exhibited a significant change in both females and males with feeding. Proteins with differential accumulation patterns in females exhibited higher fold changes with feeding than did those in males. This difference may be due to major and rapid physiological changes occurring in females upon finding a host tree during the physiological shift from dispersal to reproduction. The significant accumulation of chaperone proteins, a cytochrome P450, and a glutathione S-transferase, indicate secondary metabolite-induced stress physiology related to chemical detoxification during early host colonization. The females' activation of vitellogenin only after encountering a host indicates deliberate partitioning of resources and a balancing of the needs of dispersal and reproduction.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus