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Multisensory training can promote or impede visual perceptual learning of speech stimuli: visual-tactile vs. visual-auditory training.

Eberhardt SP, Auer ET, Bernstein LE - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training.Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training.Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee's primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee's lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Communication Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, George Washington University Washington, DC, USA.

ABSTRACT
In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that audiovisual (AV) training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only (AO) perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO) training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA) training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded AO stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee's primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee's lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory (RHT).

No MeSH data available.


Pre- vs. post-training consonant identification scored in terms of phoneme equivalence classes (PECs). The participants who did not receive visual training (−V) comprised those in the AO and control groups. The participants who did receive visual training (+V) comprised the VO, VA, and VT groups. (Initial = initial consonant; Medial = medial consonant; Final = final consonant).
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Figure 9: Pre- vs. post-training consonant identification scored in terms of phoneme equivalence classes (PECs). The participants who did not receive visual training (−V) comprised those in the AO and control groups. The participants who did receive visual training (+V) comprised the VO, VA, and VT groups. (Initial = initial consonant; Medial = medial consonant; Final = final consonant).

Mentions: Figure 9 shows the results across groups (with, without visual training experience) over test time (pre-, post-), and for each consonant position (initial, medial, final) scored in terms of phoneme equivalence class scoring. The analysis of these factors showed that position was reliable, F(1,71) = 145.471, p = 0.000, = 0.804. Test time was reliable, F(1,72) = 26.779, p = 0.000, = 0.271, as was its interaction with lipreading screening F(1,72) = 5.164, p = 0.026, = 0.067.


Multisensory training can promote or impede visual perceptual learning of speech stimuli: visual-tactile vs. visual-auditory training.

Eberhardt SP, Auer ET, Bernstein LE - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Pre- vs. post-training consonant identification scored in terms of phoneme equivalence classes (PECs). The participants who did not receive visual training (−V) comprised those in the AO and control groups. The participants who did receive visual training (+V) comprised the VO, VA, and VT groups. (Initial = initial consonant; Medial = medial consonant; Final = final consonant).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215828&req=5

Figure 9: Pre- vs. post-training consonant identification scored in terms of phoneme equivalence classes (PECs). The participants who did not receive visual training (−V) comprised those in the AO and control groups. The participants who did receive visual training (+V) comprised the VO, VA, and VT groups. (Initial = initial consonant; Medial = medial consonant; Final = final consonant).
Mentions: Figure 9 shows the results across groups (with, without visual training experience) over test time (pre-, post-), and for each consonant position (initial, medial, final) scored in terms of phoneme equivalence class scoring. The analysis of these factors showed that position was reliable, F(1,71) = 145.471, p = 0.000, = 0.804. Test time was reliable, F(1,72) = 26.779, p = 0.000, = 0.271, as was its interaction with lipreading screening F(1,72) = 5.164, p = 0.026, = 0.067.

Bottom Line: Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training.Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training.Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee's primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee's lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Communication Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, George Washington University Washington, DC, USA.

ABSTRACT
In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that audiovisual (AV) training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only (AO) perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO) training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA) training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded AO stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee's primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee's lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory (RHT).

No MeSH data available.