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Secretion properties, clearance, and therapy in airway disease.

Rubin BK - Transl Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: These airway diseases each are associated with the production of mucus and sputum with characteristic composition, polymer structure, and biophysical properties.These properties change with the progress of the disease making it possible to use sputum analysis to identify the potential cause and severity of airway diseases.This information has also been important for the development of effective mucoactive therapy to promote airway hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 1001 East Marshall St., P.O. Box 980646, Richmond, VA 23298 USA.

ABSTRACT
Chronic airway diseases like cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, asthma, diffuse panbronchiolitis, and bronchiectasis are all associated with chronic inflammation. The airway mucosa responds to infection and inflammation in part by surface mucous (goblet) cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia and hypertrophy with mucus hypersecretion. Products of inflammation including neutrophil derived DNA and filamentous actin, effete cells, bacteria, and cell debris all contribute to mucus purulence and, when this is expectorated it is called sputum. Mucus is usually cleared by ciliary movement, and sputum is cleared by cough. These airway diseases each are associated with the production of mucus and sputum with characteristic composition, polymer structure, and biophysical properties. These properties change with the progress of the disease making it possible to use sputum analysis to identify the potential cause and severity of airway diseases. This information has also been important for the development of effective mucoactive therapy to promote airway hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Confocal micrograph showing mucin polymers (Texas red-UEA) and DNA polymers (Green - YoYo1) in bronchitis (left) and cystic fibrosis (right) sputum.
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Fig1: Confocal micrograph showing mucin polymers (Texas red-UEA) and DNA polymers (Green - YoYo1) in bronchitis (left) and cystic fibrosis (right) sputum.

Mentions: Mucus clearance is a primary defense mechanism of the lung. Mucus is a barrier to airway water loss and microbial invasion and it is essential for the clearance of inhaled foreign matter [1]. Mucus is a viscoelastic gel consisting of water and high molecular weight glycoproteins, called mucins, mixed with serum and cellular proteins and lipids. The principal gel-forming mucins in the human airway are MUC5AC and MUC5B [2, 3]. There are variable amounts of cell debris and particulate matter in normal mucus. Sputum is expectorated mucus mixed with inflammatory cells, cellular debris, DNA and F-actin, as well as bacteria [4] (FigureĀ 1). In cystic fibrosis (CF), there is almost no intact mucin in the airway secretions [5] due to mucin degradation by serine proteases [6]. These secretions are biochemically identical to pus.Figure 1


Secretion properties, clearance, and therapy in airway disease.

Rubin BK - Transl Respir Med (2014)

Confocal micrograph showing mucin polymers (Texas red-UEA) and DNA polymers (Green - YoYo1) in bronchitis (left) and cystic fibrosis (right) sputum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215824&req=5

Fig1: Confocal micrograph showing mucin polymers (Texas red-UEA) and DNA polymers (Green - YoYo1) in bronchitis (left) and cystic fibrosis (right) sputum.
Mentions: Mucus clearance is a primary defense mechanism of the lung. Mucus is a barrier to airway water loss and microbial invasion and it is essential for the clearance of inhaled foreign matter [1]. Mucus is a viscoelastic gel consisting of water and high molecular weight glycoproteins, called mucins, mixed with serum and cellular proteins and lipids. The principal gel-forming mucins in the human airway are MUC5AC and MUC5B [2, 3]. There are variable amounts of cell debris and particulate matter in normal mucus. Sputum is expectorated mucus mixed with inflammatory cells, cellular debris, DNA and F-actin, as well as bacteria [4] (FigureĀ 1). In cystic fibrosis (CF), there is almost no intact mucin in the airway secretions [5] due to mucin degradation by serine proteases [6]. These secretions are biochemically identical to pus.Figure 1

Bottom Line: These airway diseases each are associated with the production of mucus and sputum with characteristic composition, polymer structure, and biophysical properties.These properties change with the progress of the disease making it possible to use sputum analysis to identify the potential cause and severity of airway diseases.This information has also been important for the development of effective mucoactive therapy to promote airway hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 1001 East Marshall St., P.O. Box 980646, Richmond, VA 23298 USA.

ABSTRACT
Chronic airway diseases like cystic fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, asthma, diffuse panbronchiolitis, and bronchiectasis are all associated with chronic inflammation. The airway mucosa responds to infection and inflammation in part by surface mucous (goblet) cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia and hypertrophy with mucus hypersecretion. Products of inflammation including neutrophil derived DNA and filamentous actin, effete cells, bacteria, and cell debris all contribute to mucus purulence and, when this is expectorated it is called sputum. Mucus is usually cleared by ciliary movement, and sputum is cleared by cough. These airway diseases each are associated with the production of mucus and sputum with characteristic composition, polymer structure, and biophysical properties. These properties change with the progress of the disease making it possible to use sputum analysis to identify the potential cause and severity of airway diseases. This information has also been important for the development of effective mucoactive therapy to promote airway hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus