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Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

Sanford MR, Cornel AJ, Nieman CC, Dinis J, Marsden CD, Weakley AM, Han S, Rodrigues A, Lanzaro GC, Lee Y - F1000Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall; confidence interval (CI): 7.45-13.6%) was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%).The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % (CI: 8.88-17.6) across collection sites.Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18) and A. pharoensis (N=6) and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vector Genetics Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, 95616, USA ; Current Affiliation: Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, 1885 Old Spanish Trail, Houston, 77054, USA.

ABSTRACT
Presence of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a sample of Anopheles gambiae s.s., A. melas and A. pharoensis collected in Guinea-Bissau during October and November 2009. The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall; confidence interval (CI): 7.45-13.6%) was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%). The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % (CI: 8.88-17.6) across collection sites. A small number of specimens of A. coluzzii, A. coluzzii x A. gambiae hybrids, A. melas and A. pharoensis were collected and had infection rates of 4.3% (CI:0.98-12.4), 4.1% (CI:0.35-14.5), 11.1% (CI:1.86-34.1) and 33.3% (CI:9.25-70.4) respectively. Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18) and A. pharoensis (N=6) and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Collection sites in Guinea-Bissau.1: Canjufa (12.43N, 14.13W), 2: Bambadinca (12.02N, 14.86W), 3: Antula (11.91N, 15.58W), 4: Prabis (11.80N, 15.74W), 5: Abu (11.46N, 15.91W), 6: Brus (11.23N, 15.88W), 7: Ponta Anabaca (11.18N, 16.14W) and 8: Eticoga (11.16N, 16.14W).
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f1: Collection sites in Guinea-Bissau.1: Canjufa (12.43N, 14.13W), 2: Bambadinca (12.02N, 14.86W), 3: Antula (11.91N, 15.58W), 4: Prabis (11.80N, 15.74W), 5: Abu (11.46N, 15.91W), 6: Brus (11.23N, 15.88W), 7: Ponta Anabaca (11.18N, 16.14W) and 8: Eticoga (11.16N, 16.14W).

Mentions: Numbers (#) indicate site locations on the map of Guinea-Bissau inFigure 1. All mosquitoes were collected indoors with a single exception; samples in Ponta Anabaca were opportunistically collected outside.


Plasmodium falciparum infection rates for some Anopheles spp. from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

Sanford MR, Cornel AJ, Nieman CC, Dinis J, Marsden CD, Weakley AM, Han S, Rodrigues A, Lanzaro GC, Lee Y - F1000Res (2014)

Collection sites in Guinea-Bissau.1: Canjufa (12.43N, 14.13W), 2: Bambadinca (12.02N, 14.86W), 3: Antula (11.91N, 15.58W), 4: Prabis (11.80N, 15.74W), 5: Abu (11.46N, 15.91W), 6: Brus (11.23N, 15.88W), 7: Ponta Anabaca (11.18N, 16.14W) and 8: Eticoga (11.16N, 16.14W).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215749&req=5

f1: Collection sites in Guinea-Bissau.1: Canjufa (12.43N, 14.13W), 2: Bambadinca (12.02N, 14.86W), 3: Antula (11.91N, 15.58W), 4: Prabis (11.80N, 15.74W), 5: Abu (11.46N, 15.91W), 6: Brus (11.23N, 15.88W), 7: Ponta Anabaca (11.18N, 16.14W) and 8: Eticoga (11.16N, 16.14W).
Mentions: Numbers (#) indicate site locations on the map of Guinea-Bissau inFigure 1. All mosquitoes were collected indoors with a single exception; samples in Ponta Anabaca were opportunistically collected outside.

Bottom Line: The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall; confidence interval (CI): 7.45-13.6%) was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%).The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % (CI: 8.88-17.6) across collection sites.Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18) and A. pharoensis (N=6) and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Vector Genetics Laboratory, Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, 95616, USA ; Current Affiliation: Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences, 1885 Old Spanish Trail, Houston, 77054, USA.

ABSTRACT
Presence of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a sample of Anopheles gambiae s.s., A. melas and A. pharoensis collected in Guinea-Bissau during October and November 2009. The percentage of P. falciparum infected samples (10.2% overall; confidence interval (CI): 7.45-13.6%) was comparable to earlier studies from other sites in Guinea-Bissau (9.6-12.4%). The majority of the specimens collected were identified as A. gambiae which had an individual infection rate of 12.6 % (CI: 8.88-17.6) across collection sites. A small number of specimens of A. coluzzii, A. coluzzii x A. gambiae hybrids, A. melas and A. pharoensis were collected and had infection rates of 4.3% (CI:0.98-12.4), 4.1% (CI:0.35-14.5), 11.1% (CI:1.86-34.1) and 33.3% (CI:9.25-70.4) respectively. Despite being present in low numbers in indoor collections, the exophilic feeding behaviors of A. melas (N=18) and A. pharoensis (N=6) and high infection rates observed in this survey suggest falciparum-malaria transmission potential outside of the protection of bed nets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus