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Practical guidance and ethical considerations for studies using photo-elicitation interviews.

Bugos E, Frasso R, FitzGerald E, True G, Adachi-Mejia AM, Cannuscio C - Prev Chronic Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: It is the foundation for photovoice projects and is a tool well-suited for community-based participatory research.Photo-elicitation yields rich data, and interview participants say these interviews encourage community awareness and engagement.Our guidelines can inform study design, protocol development, and institutional review board approval.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

ABSTRACT
Photo-elicitation is a qualitative interviewing technique that has gained popularity in recent years. It is the foundation for photovoice projects and is a tool well-suited for community-based participatory research. Photo-elicitation yields rich data, and interview participants say these interviews encourage community awareness and engagement. This article draws on 9 studies, conducted by researchers at 3 institutions (the University of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) in partnership with community-based organizations and students, in which 303 participants completed photo-elicitation interviews. We offer 8 practical suggestions for overcoming challenges encountered during photo-elicitation research and for managing ethical concerns about the use of visual data in public health research. Our guidelines can inform study design, protocol development, and institutional review board approval.

Show MeSH
Number of Web of Science articles found for the search term “photovoice” as topic each year from 1997 through 2013.YearNo. of Articles199711998119991200022001220021200332004920058200613200717200817200935201042201145201275201387
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Figure 1: Number of Web of Science articles found for the search term “photovoice” as topic each year from 1997 through 2013.YearNo. of Articles199711998119991200022001220021200332004920058200613200717200817200935201042201145201275201387

Mentions: Photo-elicitation is a qualitative research technique developed in 1957 that uses images to prompt and guide in-depth interviews (1). Researchers ask members of the community under study to photograph or videotape their environment. The photographers then comment on the images they take. Photo-elicitation is a core component of photovoice, which was first described in 1997 and is a form of community-based participatory research that engages participants at each step of the research process as documentarians, commentators, and agents of social and political change (2,3). The terms “photo-elicitation” and “photovoice” are often used interchangeably. However, we make the distinction that photo-elicitation focuses on the interview process itself, whereas photovoice is a more comprehensive term reflecting an action-oriented research strategy. A Web of Science search in 2000 for studies that included the term “photovoice” produced only 5 articles; by 2013, the cumulative number of articles had grown to 359 (Figure), the increase driven in part by the use of digital cameras and smartphones.


Practical guidance and ethical considerations for studies using photo-elicitation interviews.

Bugos E, Frasso R, FitzGerald E, True G, Adachi-Mejia AM, Cannuscio C - Prev Chronic Dis (2014)

Number of Web of Science articles found for the search term “photovoice” as topic each year from 1997 through 2013.YearNo. of Articles199711998119991200022001220021200332004920058200613200717200817200935201042201145201275201387
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215569&req=5

Figure 1: Number of Web of Science articles found for the search term “photovoice” as topic each year from 1997 through 2013.YearNo. of Articles199711998119991200022001220021200332004920058200613200717200817200935201042201145201275201387
Mentions: Photo-elicitation is a qualitative research technique developed in 1957 that uses images to prompt and guide in-depth interviews (1). Researchers ask members of the community under study to photograph or videotape their environment. The photographers then comment on the images they take. Photo-elicitation is a core component of photovoice, which was first described in 1997 and is a form of community-based participatory research that engages participants at each step of the research process as documentarians, commentators, and agents of social and political change (2,3). The terms “photo-elicitation” and “photovoice” are often used interchangeably. However, we make the distinction that photo-elicitation focuses on the interview process itself, whereas photovoice is a more comprehensive term reflecting an action-oriented research strategy. A Web of Science search in 2000 for studies that included the term “photovoice” produced only 5 articles; by 2013, the cumulative number of articles had grown to 359 (Figure), the increase driven in part by the use of digital cameras and smartphones.

Bottom Line: It is the foundation for photovoice projects and is a tool well-suited for community-based participatory research.Photo-elicitation yields rich data, and interview participants say these interviews encourage community awareness and engagement.Our guidelines can inform study design, protocol development, and institutional review board approval.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

ABSTRACT
Photo-elicitation is a qualitative interviewing technique that has gained popularity in recent years. It is the foundation for photovoice projects and is a tool well-suited for community-based participatory research. Photo-elicitation yields rich data, and interview participants say these interviews encourage community awareness and engagement. This article draws on 9 studies, conducted by researchers at 3 institutions (the University of Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) in partnership with community-based organizations and students, in which 303 participants completed photo-elicitation interviews. We offer 8 practical suggestions for overcoming challenges encountered during photo-elicitation research and for managing ethical concerns about the use of visual data in public health research. Our guidelines can inform study design, protocol development, and institutional review board approval.

Show MeSH