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Study of serum interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6 levels in relation with the clinical disease severity in chronic idiopathic urticaria patients of Kashmir (North India).

Rasool R, Ashiq I, Shera IA, Yousuf Q, Shah ZA - Asia Pac Allergy (2014)

Bottom Line: Various cytokines have been found to be involved in inflammatory processes associated with chronic idiopathic urticaria, including interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6.However, statistical significance was found both in IL-18 and IL-6 concentrations in certain grades with regard to the clinical disease severity of urticaria.There is no significant association as such found between IL-18 and IL-6 levels with CIU, however, these cytokines may help in predicting the clinical disease severity in CIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Immunology & Molecular Medicine, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Soura, Srinagar 190011, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic urticaria is termed as idiopathic if there is an absence of any identifiable causes of mast cell and basophil degranulation. Various cytokines have been found to be involved in inflammatory processes associated with chronic idiopathic urticaria, including interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6.

Objective: To evaluate any possible correlation of IL-18 and IL-6 cytokines with the clinical disease severity in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU).

Methods: IL-18 and IL-6 levels of CIU patients (n = 62) and healthy controls (n = 27) were assessed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits following the manufacturer's protocols.

Results: Serum IL-18 concentration (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 62.95 ± 36.09 pg/mL) in CIU patients and in healthy controls (54.35 ± 18.45 pg/mL) showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between autologous serum skin test (ASST) positive and ASST negative patients with regard to the serum IL-18 levels either. Similarly, serum IL-6 concentration (0.82 ± 4.6 pg/mL) in CIU patients and in healthy controls (0.12 ± 1.7 pg/mL), showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Also, comparison between positive and ASST negative patients with regard to the serum IL-6 levels was statistically nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, statistical significance was found both in IL-18 and IL-6 concentrations in certain grades with regard to the clinical disease severity of urticaria.

Conclusion: There is no significant association as such found between IL-18 and IL-6 levels with CIU, however, these cytokines may help in predicting the clinical disease severity in CIU. Hence, these cytokines may indicate a potential role as a biomarker to assess the disease severity in CIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum interleukin (IL) 18 levels in autologous serum skin test positive patients classified according to clinical severity score. SD, standard deviation. *p < 0.05, statistical significant.
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Figure 1: Serum interleukin (IL) 18 levels in autologous serum skin test positive patients classified according to clinical severity score. SD, standard deviation. *p < 0.05, statistical significant.

Mentions: When the patients with CIU were grouped according to the severity of the disease, the highest serum IL-18 levels were detected in patients with severe disease with a statistical significance found in grade III (n = 8) and grade IV (n = 2) (p < 0.05) among the ASST positive patients when compared with grade I (n = 16) (Fig. 1). However, in case of ASST negative patients statistical significance was found in grade III (n = 3) only when compared to grade I (n = 16) as shown in Fig. 2.


Study of serum interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6 levels in relation with the clinical disease severity in chronic idiopathic urticaria patients of Kashmir (North India).

Rasool R, Ashiq I, Shera IA, Yousuf Q, Shah ZA - Asia Pac Allergy (2014)

Serum interleukin (IL) 18 levels in autologous serum skin test positive patients classified according to clinical severity score. SD, standard deviation. *p < 0.05, statistical significant.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215435&req=5

Figure 1: Serum interleukin (IL) 18 levels in autologous serum skin test positive patients classified according to clinical severity score. SD, standard deviation. *p < 0.05, statistical significant.
Mentions: When the patients with CIU were grouped according to the severity of the disease, the highest serum IL-18 levels were detected in patients with severe disease with a statistical significance found in grade III (n = 8) and grade IV (n = 2) (p < 0.05) among the ASST positive patients when compared with grade I (n = 16) (Fig. 1). However, in case of ASST negative patients statistical significance was found in grade III (n = 3) only when compared to grade I (n = 16) as shown in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: Various cytokines have been found to be involved in inflammatory processes associated with chronic idiopathic urticaria, including interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6.However, statistical significance was found both in IL-18 and IL-6 concentrations in certain grades with regard to the clinical disease severity of urticaria.There is no significant association as such found between IL-18 and IL-6 levels with CIU, however, these cytokines may help in predicting the clinical disease severity in CIU.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Immunology & Molecular Medicine, Sher-I-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Soura, Srinagar 190011, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chronic urticaria is termed as idiopathic if there is an absence of any identifiable causes of mast cell and basophil degranulation. Various cytokines have been found to be involved in inflammatory processes associated with chronic idiopathic urticaria, including interleukin (IL) 18 and IL-6.

Objective: To evaluate any possible correlation of IL-18 and IL-6 cytokines with the clinical disease severity in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU).

Methods: IL-18 and IL-6 levels of CIU patients (n = 62) and healthy controls (n = 27) were assessed by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits following the manufacturer's protocols.

Results: Serum IL-18 concentration (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 62.95 ± 36.09 pg/mL) in CIU patients and in healthy controls (54.35 ± 18.45 pg/mL) showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between autologous serum skin test (ASST) positive and ASST negative patients with regard to the serum IL-18 levels either. Similarly, serum IL-6 concentration (0.82 ± 4.6 pg/mL) in CIU patients and in healthy controls (0.12 ± 1.7 pg/mL), showed no statistical significance (p > 0.05). Also, comparison between positive and ASST negative patients with regard to the serum IL-6 levels was statistically nonsignificant (p > 0.05). However, statistical significance was found both in IL-18 and IL-6 concentrations in certain grades with regard to the clinical disease severity of urticaria.

Conclusion: There is no significant association as such found between IL-18 and IL-6 levels with CIU, however, these cytokines may help in predicting the clinical disease severity in CIU. Hence, these cytokines may indicate a potential role as a biomarker to assess the disease severity in CIU.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus