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A novel perspective on seed yield of broad bean (Vicia faba L.): differences resulting from pod characteristics.

Li X, Yang Y - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: There were significant differences in seed yield per plant among the four plant categories.We calculated the effects of increasing the proportion of each plant category by 10% or to 100% on seed yield, and found that seed yield could be improved by increasing the ratio of plants with the highest seed production rate.This study provides a novel perspective on estimating the seed yield of broad bean.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [2] Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [3] Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research at Kunming, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [4] University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Broad bean (Vicia faba L.) is an important crop worldwide. An increase in seed yield would increase both the grain reserve and the profit for farmers. Previous studies on increasing broad bean seed yield have focused mainly on increases at the whole population level. Few studies have focused on the differences in plant type within populations. In this study, we classified broad bean plants into four categories based on pod type, and then evaluated the ratio of each category in field-grown broad bean populations. We analysed the seed and pod characteristics of each category, and their contributions to total seed yield. The number of seeds per pod, and the number of pods or seeds per plant differed among the four plant categories, but the seed weight was relatively uniform. There were significant differences in seed yield per plant among the four plant categories. We calculated the effects of increasing the proportion of each plant category by 10% or to 100% on seed yield, and found that seed yield could be improved by increasing the ratio of plants with the highest seed production rate. This study provides a novel perspective on estimating the seed yield of broad bean.

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Sketch map of survey quadrats in farmland.Numbers in boxes indicate quadrat number.
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f5: Sketch map of survey quadrats in farmland.Numbers in boxes indicate quadrat number.

Mentions: In southwest China, broad bean seeds are usually sown in October and harvested in May of the following year. Our study was conducted in April 2014, when the seeds were mature, in 40 × 10 m2 farmland plots in Qujing, Yunnan, China. The broad bean cultivar used in this study was Kidney bean 147. The plants were grown from parental seeds that were collected from the same population; therefore, the studied population had a similar genetic background. During the growth period, no fertilizer was applied and 15 mg L−1 deltamethyrin solution was evenly sprayed to control aphids in mid-February during flowering. A total of 15 quadrats, each 2 × 2 m2, were evaluated (Figure 5). In each quadrat, we recorded the number of plants in the four categories and the number of pods in each pod type. The proportions of plants in each category and pod type per unit area were calculated based on the quadrat area.


A novel perspective on seed yield of broad bean (Vicia faba L.): differences resulting from pod characteristics.

Li X, Yang Y - Sci Rep (2014)

Sketch map of survey quadrats in farmland.Numbers in boxes indicate quadrat number.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215298&req=5

f5: Sketch map of survey quadrats in farmland.Numbers in boxes indicate quadrat number.
Mentions: In southwest China, broad bean seeds are usually sown in October and harvested in May of the following year. Our study was conducted in April 2014, when the seeds were mature, in 40 × 10 m2 farmland plots in Qujing, Yunnan, China. The broad bean cultivar used in this study was Kidney bean 147. The plants were grown from parental seeds that were collected from the same population; therefore, the studied population had a similar genetic background. During the growth period, no fertilizer was applied and 15 mg L−1 deltamethyrin solution was evenly sprayed to control aphids in mid-February during flowering. A total of 15 quadrats, each 2 × 2 m2, were evaluated (Figure 5). In each quadrat, we recorded the number of plants in the four categories and the number of pods in each pod type. The proportions of plants in each category and pod type per unit area were calculated based on the quadrat area.

Bottom Line: There were significant differences in seed yield per plant among the four plant categories.We calculated the effects of increasing the proportion of each plant category by 10% or to 100% on seed yield, and found that seed yield could be improved by increasing the ratio of plants with the highest seed production rate.This study provides a novel perspective on estimating the seed yield of broad bean.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Key Laboratory for Plant Diversity and Biogeography of East Asia, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [2] Germplasm Bank of Wild Species, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [3] Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research at Kunming, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650201, P. R. China [4] University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Broad bean (Vicia faba L.) is an important crop worldwide. An increase in seed yield would increase both the grain reserve and the profit for farmers. Previous studies on increasing broad bean seed yield have focused mainly on increases at the whole population level. Few studies have focused on the differences in plant type within populations. In this study, we classified broad bean plants into four categories based on pod type, and then evaluated the ratio of each category in field-grown broad bean populations. We analysed the seed and pod characteristics of each category, and their contributions to total seed yield. The number of seeds per pod, and the number of pods or seeds per plant differed among the four plant categories, but the seed weight was relatively uniform. There were significant differences in seed yield per plant among the four plant categories. We calculated the effects of increasing the proportion of each plant category by 10% or to 100% on seed yield, and found that seed yield could be improved by increasing the ratio of plants with the highest seed production rate. This study provides a novel perspective on estimating the seed yield of broad bean.

Show MeSH