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Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental anxiety as a measure of food habits.
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fig14: Dental anxiety as a measure of food habits.

Mentions: Intake of food was also measured as a factor of anxiety prevalent among students. In the Indian population, 42% of participants were vegetarians and 58% were nonvegetarians. Their anxiety scores were 58.4% and 61.3%, respectively, (Figure 14). This small increase from a moderate to high category suggests that the kind of food consumed is also a significant contributing factor to the anxiety people experience. Several researchers have concluded that dental anxiety varies in different social groups and tribes [14], depending on varying food habits and lifestyles. The vegetarian diet is rich in minerals, vitamins, and proteins, with a high fiber content compared to the nonvegetarian diet, which has a high amount of sticky fats. These sticky fats stick to the hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity and promote growth of bacteria and plaque, thereby increasing acid attack, foul odor, and other related oral problems. The vegetarian lifestyle is associated with better oral hygiene and thus reduced fears and anxiety. However, diet alone is not sufficient. A patient with a vegetarian diet but poor oral practices may be more prone to oral problems compared to a nonvegetarian with excellent oral hygiene practices. Several interrelated practices need to be considered to correctly evaluate the dental anxiety among the youth.


Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Dental anxiety as a measure of food habits.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215002&req=5

fig14: Dental anxiety as a measure of food habits.
Mentions: Intake of food was also measured as a factor of anxiety prevalent among students. In the Indian population, 42% of participants were vegetarians and 58% were nonvegetarians. Their anxiety scores were 58.4% and 61.3%, respectively, (Figure 14). This small increase from a moderate to high category suggests that the kind of food consumed is also a significant contributing factor to the anxiety people experience. Several researchers have concluded that dental anxiety varies in different social groups and tribes [14], depending on varying food habits and lifestyles. The vegetarian diet is rich in minerals, vitamins, and proteins, with a high fiber content compared to the nonvegetarian diet, which has a high amount of sticky fats. These sticky fats stick to the hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity and promote growth of bacteria and plaque, thereby increasing acid attack, foul odor, and other related oral problems. The vegetarian lifestyle is associated with better oral hygiene and thus reduced fears and anxiety. However, diet alone is not sufficient. A patient with a vegetarian diet but poor oral practices may be more prone to oral problems compared to a nonvegetarian with excellent oral hygiene practices. Several interrelated practices need to be considered to correctly evaluate the dental anxiety among the youth.

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus