Limits...
Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental anxiety as a measure of alcohol intake.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215002&req=5

fig13: Dental anxiety as a measure of alcohol intake.

Mentions: Intake of alcohol was also assessed and related with anxiety levels among teenagers. Regular drinkers were found to be higher in proportion in comparison to smoking, i.e., 26%, probably because drinking was a more socially prevalent and acceptable habit in the Indian setting. However, anxiety levels also increased at the same time to 64.6% (FigureĀ 13). According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America [54], about 15 million adults in the United States have social anxiety disorder in any given year. These people drink excessively to evade the anxious situation, which is not just a temporary escape mechanism, but also increases the susceptibility to increased fears and anxiety. Several researchers have reported that there is a strong correlation between drinking alcohol and various types of cancers [55,56]. According to the report on carcinogens by the US Department of Health and Human Services, alcohol has been categorized as a human carcinogen. Research indicates that increased alcohol consumption multiplies the risk of alcohol related onco-diseases. An estimated 19,500 deaths in the United States each year are due to the consumption of alcohol [57]. The latest research indicates there is a much greater risk of developing oral cancer, especially pharynx, larynx, and esophagus, with the use of alcohol and tobacco together than when used alone [58]. Thus, smoking and drinking not only contribute to the fear of an oral disease but invariably contribute to anxiety for an unexpected, unknown onco-disease predisposing the patients to a greater anxiety in any treatment situation. The nonsmokers and/or nondrinkers have greater oral, general, physiological, and psychological health, and are more confident and better able to cope with any anxious events during any type of treatment.


Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Dental anxiety as a measure of alcohol intake.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215002&req=5

fig13: Dental anxiety as a measure of alcohol intake.
Mentions: Intake of alcohol was also assessed and related with anxiety levels among teenagers. Regular drinkers were found to be higher in proportion in comparison to smoking, i.e., 26%, probably because drinking was a more socially prevalent and acceptable habit in the Indian setting. However, anxiety levels also increased at the same time to 64.6% (FigureĀ 13). According to Anxiety and Depression Association of America [54], about 15 million adults in the United States have social anxiety disorder in any given year. These people drink excessively to evade the anxious situation, which is not just a temporary escape mechanism, but also increases the susceptibility to increased fears and anxiety. Several researchers have reported that there is a strong correlation between drinking alcohol and various types of cancers [55,56]. According to the report on carcinogens by the US Department of Health and Human Services, alcohol has been categorized as a human carcinogen. Research indicates that increased alcohol consumption multiplies the risk of alcohol related onco-diseases. An estimated 19,500 deaths in the United States each year are due to the consumption of alcohol [57]. The latest research indicates there is a much greater risk of developing oral cancer, especially pharynx, larynx, and esophagus, with the use of alcohol and tobacco together than when used alone [58]. Thus, smoking and drinking not only contribute to the fear of an oral disease but invariably contribute to anxiety for an unexpected, unknown onco-disease predisposing the patients to a greater anxiety in any treatment situation. The nonsmokers and/or nondrinkers have greater oral, general, physiological, and psychological health, and are more confident and better able to cope with any anxious events during any type of treatment.

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus