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Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental anxiety as a measure of smoking habits of adolescents.
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fig12: Dental anxiety as a measure of smoking habits of adolescents.

Mentions: In addition to dental cleaning habits, smoking habits were also found to be strongly associated with the degree of anxiety people experienced. A total of 85% of the Indian college population belonged to the nonsmoking category, whereas only 15% were smokers (Figure 12). Their anxiety levels were 57.7% and 62.6%, respectively. The relationship between the use of tobacco and cancers of the head, neck, and the lungs has been established for almost 5 decades. Of the estimated 53,000 cases diagnosed with head and neck cancer each year in the United States, around 85% are attributed to the use of tobacco. Smoking causes mutations in tumor suppressor genes and dominant oncogenes and by impairing the immunological response and the mucociliary clearance in the lungs, it promotes cancer development [51–53].


Dental Procedures, Oral Practices, and Associated Anxiety: A Study on Late-teenagers.

Bhola R, Malhotra R - Osong Public Health Res Perspect (2014)

Dental anxiety as a measure of smoking habits of adolescents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4215002&req=5

fig12: Dental anxiety as a measure of smoking habits of adolescents.
Mentions: In addition to dental cleaning habits, smoking habits were also found to be strongly associated with the degree of anxiety people experienced. A total of 85% of the Indian college population belonged to the nonsmoking category, whereas only 15% were smokers (Figure 12). Their anxiety levels were 57.7% and 62.6%, respectively. The relationship between the use of tobacco and cancers of the head, neck, and the lungs has been established for almost 5 decades. Of the estimated 53,000 cases diagnosed with head and neck cancer each year in the United States, around 85% are attributed to the use of tobacco. Smoking causes mutations in tumor suppressor genes and dominant oncogenes and by impairing the immunological response and the mucociliary clearance in the lungs, it promotes cancer development [51–53].

Bottom Line: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment.The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help.Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aims to determine the degree of anxiety pertaining to dental procedures and various oral hygiene practices among college teenagers.

Methods: Corah's Modified Dental Anxiety Scale was administered on a randomly chosen sample of 100 Indian college students (50 males and 50 females) of Delhi University, belonging to the age group of 17-20 years.

Results: Descriptive statistical computations revealed 12.14 years as the mean age of first dental visit, with moderately high levels of anxiety (60.75%) for various dental procedures among the Indian teenagers and 5% lying in the "phobic or extremely anxious" category. With merely 4.16% people going for regular consultations, general check-ups evoked 78.3% anxiety and having an injection or a tooth removed was perceived as the most threatening. The sample subgroup not using mouthwash and mouthspray, smokers, and alcohol drinkers with improper oral hygiene practices experienced much higher anxiety towards routine dental procedures.

Conclusion: The majority of the Indian youngsters had an evasive attitude of delaying dental treatment. The core problems lay in deficient health care knowledge, lack of patient-sensitive pedagogy to train dental professionals, inaccessibility of services, and a dismissive attitude towards medical help. The feelings of fear and anxiety prevalent among the Indian youth offer significant insights into causes and preventive measures for future research and practice. Methods of education and motivation could be developed to dissipate the anxiety amongst Indian teenagers that prevent routine dental visits and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus