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Is the environment of the endoscopy unit a reservoir of pathogens?

Choi ES, Choi JH, Lee JM, Lee SM, Lee YJ, Kang YJ, Kim ES, Cho KB, Park KS, Jang BK, Hwang JS, Chung WJ, Ryoo NH, Jeon SW, Jung MK - Intest Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse.The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp..No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Given the characteristic procedures involved in the endoscopy unit, the spread of pathogens is much more frequent in this unit than in other environments. However, there is a lack of data elucidating the existence of pathogens in the endoscopy unit. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of possible pathogens in the endoscopy unit.

Methods: We performed environmental culture using samples from the endoscopy rooms of 2 tertiary hospitals. We used sterile cotton-tipped swabs moistened with sterile saline to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. Then, we cultured the swab in blood agar plate. Samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in thioglycollate broth to detect the presence of anaerobes. After 2 weeks of culture period, we counted the colony numbers.

Results: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse. The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp.. No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

Conclusions: Although the organisms detected in the endoscopy unit were mainly non-pathogenic organisms, they might cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the environment of the endoscopy room should be managed appropriately; moreover, individual hand hygiene is important for preventing possible hospital-acquired infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of microbial species isolated by culture of samples from various surfaces. BAC, Bacillus spp.; MIC, Micrococcus spp.; STR, Streptococcus spp.; STA, staphylococcus spp.; ETC, enterococcus.
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Figure 2: Distribution of microbial species isolated by culture of samples from various surfaces. BAC, Bacillus spp.; MIC, Micrococcus spp.; STR, Streptococcus spp.; STA, staphylococcus spp.; ETC, enterococcus.

Mentions: After we collected and analyzed a total of 197 environmental samples, we found that the doctor's computer keyboard had the highest colony count, 974 CFUs, in the endoscopy room, followed by the nurse's cart (918 CFUs) and nurse's computer mouse (764 CFUs). On further breaking down the bacterial isolates according to species, Staphylococcus spp. was the species with the highest number of CFUs, followed by Micrococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. However, no anaerobic organism was detected in the samples. The culture of the sample from the doctor's computer keyboard had 679 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 224 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 8 CFUs of Streptococcus spp.; the nurse's cart had 376 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 291 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 122 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., and 89 CFUs of Bacillus spp.; the nurse's computer mouse had 487 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 204 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 35 CFUs of Micrococcus spp.; and the endoscopy keyboard had 305 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 146 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 44 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., and 40 CFUs of Bacillus spp. A total of 502 CFUs of bacterial isolates were observed on the culture of the sample from the backrest of the doctors' chair: 275 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 146 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 40 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 22 CFUs of Streptococcus spp. A total of 357 CFUs of bacterial isolates were observed on the culture of the sample from the surface of the oxygen cannula connector: 148 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 122 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 40 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., and 12 CFUs of Bacillus spp. A total of 298 CFUs were found on the culture of the sample from the endoscopic handle: 137 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 115 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 41 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 1 CFU Streptococcus spp. Further, a total of 180 CFUs were found on the culture of the sample from the doctor's computer mouse: 112 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 10 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 9 CFUs of Streptococcus spp. (Fig. 2). These results indicate that more colonies were formed on cultures from samples taken from surfaces most often touched by doctors and nurses. Although the species of bacterial isolates may differ depending on each sampling surface, the study failed to detect any definite pathogenic bacterial microorganism including Clostridium difficile,7Helicobacter pylori, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus, whose existence was suspected before the test.


Is the environment of the endoscopy unit a reservoir of pathogens?

Choi ES, Choi JH, Lee JM, Lee SM, Lee YJ, Kang YJ, Kim ES, Cho KB, Park KS, Jang BK, Hwang JS, Chung WJ, Ryoo NH, Jeon SW, Jung MK - Intest Res (2014)

Distribution of microbial species isolated by culture of samples from various surfaces. BAC, Bacillus spp.; MIC, Micrococcus spp.; STR, Streptococcus spp.; STA, staphylococcus spp.; ETC, enterococcus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214958&req=5

Figure 2: Distribution of microbial species isolated by culture of samples from various surfaces. BAC, Bacillus spp.; MIC, Micrococcus spp.; STR, Streptococcus spp.; STA, staphylococcus spp.; ETC, enterococcus.
Mentions: After we collected and analyzed a total of 197 environmental samples, we found that the doctor's computer keyboard had the highest colony count, 974 CFUs, in the endoscopy room, followed by the nurse's cart (918 CFUs) and nurse's computer mouse (764 CFUs). On further breaking down the bacterial isolates according to species, Staphylococcus spp. was the species with the highest number of CFUs, followed by Micrococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. However, no anaerobic organism was detected in the samples. The culture of the sample from the doctor's computer keyboard had 679 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 224 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 8 CFUs of Streptococcus spp.; the nurse's cart had 376 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 291 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 122 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., and 89 CFUs of Bacillus spp.; the nurse's computer mouse had 487 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 204 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 35 CFUs of Micrococcus spp.; and the endoscopy keyboard had 305 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 146 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 44 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., and 40 CFUs of Bacillus spp. A total of 502 CFUs of bacterial isolates were observed on the culture of the sample from the backrest of the doctors' chair: 275 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 146 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 40 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 22 CFUs of Streptococcus spp. A total of 357 CFUs of bacterial isolates were observed on the culture of the sample from the surface of the oxygen cannula connector: 148 CFUs of Streptococcus spp., 122 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 40 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., and 12 CFUs of Bacillus spp. A total of 298 CFUs were found on the culture of the sample from the endoscopic handle: 137 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 115 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 41 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 1 CFU Streptococcus spp. Further, a total of 180 CFUs were found on the culture of the sample from the doctor's computer mouse: 112 CFUs of Staphylococcus spp., 37 CFUs of Micrococcus spp., 10 CFUs of Bacillus spp., and 9 CFUs of Streptococcus spp. (Fig. 2). These results indicate that more colonies were formed on cultures from samples taken from surfaces most often touched by doctors and nurses. Although the species of bacterial isolates may differ depending on each sampling surface, the study failed to detect any definite pathogenic bacterial microorganism including Clostridium difficile,7Helicobacter pylori, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus, whose existence was suspected before the test.

Bottom Line: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse.The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp..No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Given the characteristic procedures involved in the endoscopy unit, the spread of pathogens is much more frequent in this unit than in other environments. However, there is a lack of data elucidating the existence of pathogens in the endoscopy unit. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of possible pathogens in the endoscopy unit.

Methods: We performed environmental culture using samples from the endoscopy rooms of 2 tertiary hospitals. We used sterile cotton-tipped swabs moistened with sterile saline to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. Then, we cultured the swab in blood agar plate. Samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in thioglycollate broth to detect the presence of anaerobes. After 2 weeks of culture period, we counted the colony numbers.

Results: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse. The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp.. No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

Conclusions: Although the organisms detected in the endoscopy unit were mainly non-pathogenic organisms, they might cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the environment of the endoscopy room should be managed appropriately; moreover, individual hand hygiene is important for preventing possible hospital-acquired infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus