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Is the environment of the endoscopy unit a reservoir of pathogens?

Choi ES, Choi JH, Lee JM, Lee SM, Lee YJ, Kang YJ, Kim ES, Cho KB, Park KS, Jang BK, Hwang JS, Chung WJ, Ryoo NH, Jeon SW, Jung MK - Intest Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse.The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp..No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Given the characteristic procedures involved in the endoscopy unit, the spread of pathogens is much more frequent in this unit than in other environments. However, there is a lack of data elucidating the existence of pathogens in the endoscopy unit. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of possible pathogens in the endoscopy unit.

Methods: We performed environmental culture using samples from the endoscopy rooms of 2 tertiary hospitals. We used sterile cotton-tipped swabs moistened with sterile saline to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. Then, we cultured the swab in blood agar plate. Samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in thioglycollate broth to detect the presence of anaerobes. After 2 weeks of culture period, we counted the colony numbers.

Results: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse. The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp.. No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

Conclusions: Although the organisms detected in the endoscopy unit were mainly non-pathogenic organisms, they might cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the environment of the endoscopy room should be managed appropriately; moreover, individual hand hygiene is important for preventing possible hospital-acquired infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The methods of environmental culture. (A) Sterile cotton-tipped swab moistened with sterile saline was used to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. (B) We cultured the swab in the blood agar plate. (C) Samples from the colonoscopy room were put in the thioglycollate broth. (D) The samples were cultured for 2 weeks.
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Figure 1: The methods of environmental culture. (A) Sterile cotton-tipped swab moistened with sterile saline was used to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. (B) We cultured the swab in the blood agar plate. (C) Samples from the colonoscopy room were put in the thioglycollate broth. (D) The samples were cultured for 2 weeks.

Mentions: To collect the samples, we used sterilized cotton swabs moistened with sterile saline and rolled the swabs on the surfaces of the environments (Fig. 1A). The collected samples were cultured on blood agar plates (Fig. 1B). Those samples collected from the colonoscopy room were once again put in thioglycollate broth (Fig. 1C). The blood agar plate is often used to check for a hospital-acquired infection, while the thioglycollate broth is used to check for the presence of anaerobic organisms in the samples. The samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in the thioglycollate broth because of the possibility of transmission of anaerobes during colonoscopy.5 After 2 weeks of culturing, we identified and counted the colony-forming units (CFUs) in the samples (Fig. 1D).6


Is the environment of the endoscopy unit a reservoir of pathogens?

Choi ES, Choi JH, Lee JM, Lee SM, Lee YJ, Kang YJ, Kim ES, Cho KB, Park KS, Jang BK, Hwang JS, Chung WJ, Ryoo NH, Jeon SW, Jung MK - Intest Res (2014)

The methods of environmental culture. (A) Sterile cotton-tipped swab moistened with sterile saline was used to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. (B) We cultured the swab in the blood agar plate. (C) Samples from the colonoscopy room were put in the thioglycollate broth. (D) The samples were cultured for 2 weeks.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214958&req=5

Figure 1: The methods of environmental culture. (A) Sterile cotton-tipped swab moistened with sterile saline was used to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. (B) We cultured the swab in the blood agar plate. (C) Samples from the colonoscopy room were put in the thioglycollate broth. (D) The samples were cultured for 2 weeks.
Mentions: To collect the samples, we used sterilized cotton swabs moistened with sterile saline and rolled the swabs on the surfaces of the environments (Fig. 1A). The collected samples were cultured on blood agar plates (Fig. 1B). Those samples collected from the colonoscopy room were once again put in thioglycollate broth (Fig. 1C). The blood agar plate is often used to check for a hospital-acquired infection, while the thioglycollate broth is used to check for the presence of anaerobic organisms in the samples. The samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in the thioglycollate broth because of the possibility of transmission of anaerobes during colonoscopy.5 After 2 weeks of culturing, we identified and counted the colony-forming units (CFUs) in the samples (Fig. 1D).6

Bottom Line: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse.The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp..No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: Given the characteristic procedures involved in the endoscopy unit, the spread of pathogens is much more frequent in this unit than in other environments. However, there is a lack of data elucidating the existence of pathogens in the endoscopy unit. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of possible pathogens in the endoscopy unit.

Methods: We performed environmental culture using samples from the endoscopy rooms of 2 tertiary hospitals. We used sterile cotton-tipped swabs moistened with sterile saline to swab the surfaces of 197 samples. Then, we cultured the swab in blood agar plate. Samples from the colonoscopy room were placed in thioglycollate broth to detect the presence of anaerobes. After 2 weeks of culture period, we counted the colony numbers.

Results: The most commonly contaminated spots were the doctor's keyboard, nurse's cart, and nurse's mouse. The common organisms found were non-pathogenic bacterial microorganisms Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, and Streptococcus spp.. No definite anaerobe organism was detected in the colonoscopy room.

Conclusions: Although the organisms detected in the endoscopy unit were mainly non-pathogenic organisms, they might cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Therefore, the environment of the endoscopy room should be managed appropriately; moreover, individual hand hygiene is important for preventing possible hospital-acquired infections.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus