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The effect of probiotics for preventing radiation-induced morphological changes in intestinal mucosa of rats.

Ki Y, Kim W, Cho H, Ahn K, Choi Y, Kim D - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy.There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation.Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Radiation therapy is an important treatment modality for abdominal or pelvic cancer, but there is a common and serious complication such as radiation-induced enteritis. Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy. In this study, morphological changes of bowel mucosa were analyzed in rats to presume the effect of probiotics on radiation-induced enteritis and its correlation with radiation dose. A total of 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received a solution containing 1.0×10(8) colony-forming units of Lactiobacillus acidophilus or water once daily for 10 days. Each of two groups was divided into three subgroups and abdomino-pelvic area of each subgroup was irradiated with 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively on the seventh day of feeding the solutions. All rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation and the mucosal thickness and villus height of jejunum, ileum and colon were measured. The morphological parameters of the small intestine represented significant differences between two solution groups irradiated 10 or 15 Gy, except for villus height of jejunum in 15 Gy-subgroup (P=0.065). There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation. Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy.

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findings in small intestines of rats 3 days after irradiation. Transverse section of jejunum in Lactobacillus acidophilus group (A) and placebo group (B) were displayed after 10 Gy of irradiation. Transverse section of ileum in L. acidophilus group (C) and placebo group (D) were exhibited after 15 Gy. Original magnifications 100 ×.
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Figure 3: findings in small intestines of rats 3 days after irradiation. Transverse section of jejunum in Lactobacillus acidophilus group (A) and placebo group (B) were displayed after 10 Gy of irradiation. Transverse section of ileum in L. acidophilus group (C) and placebo group (D) were exhibited after 15 Gy. Original magnifications 100 ×.

Mentions: Mucosal thickness and villous height of jejunum decreased significantly as the radiation dose increased (P<0.001 for both; Fig. 2). In the comparison with placebo group, mucosal thickness and villous height of jejunum were significantly taller in L. acidophilus group after 10 Gy of irradiation (P<0.001 and P=0.003, respectively; Table 1). Histologic findings of jejunum after 10 Gy irradiation are displayed in Fig. 3A and B. In the rats were irradiated with 15 Gy, thickness of jejunal mucosa in L. acidophilus group were significantly greater than that in placebo group (P=0.015). However, the analysis of villus height of jejunum showed a marginally significant difference between two groups (P=0.065). There was no significant difference of the two morphometric variables between the solution groups in jejunum of the rats received 20 Gy of irradiation.


The effect of probiotics for preventing radiation-induced morphological changes in intestinal mucosa of rats.

Ki Y, Kim W, Cho H, Ahn K, Choi Y, Kim D - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

findings in small intestines of rats 3 days after irradiation. Transverse section of jejunum in Lactobacillus acidophilus group (A) and placebo group (B) were displayed after 10 Gy of irradiation. Transverse section of ileum in L. acidophilus group (C) and placebo group (D) were exhibited after 15 Gy. Original magnifications 100 ×.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214937&req=5

Figure 3: findings in small intestines of rats 3 days after irradiation. Transverse section of jejunum in Lactobacillus acidophilus group (A) and placebo group (B) were displayed after 10 Gy of irradiation. Transverse section of ileum in L. acidophilus group (C) and placebo group (D) were exhibited after 15 Gy. Original magnifications 100 ×.
Mentions: Mucosal thickness and villous height of jejunum decreased significantly as the radiation dose increased (P<0.001 for both; Fig. 2). In the comparison with placebo group, mucosal thickness and villous height of jejunum were significantly taller in L. acidophilus group after 10 Gy of irradiation (P<0.001 and P=0.003, respectively; Table 1). Histologic findings of jejunum after 10 Gy irradiation are displayed in Fig. 3A and B. In the rats were irradiated with 15 Gy, thickness of jejunal mucosa in L. acidophilus group were significantly greater than that in placebo group (P=0.015). However, the analysis of villus height of jejunum showed a marginally significant difference between two groups (P=0.065). There was no significant difference of the two morphometric variables between the solution groups in jejunum of the rats received 20 Gy of irradiation.

Bottom Line: Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy.There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation.Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Radiation therapy is an important treatment modality for abdominal or pelvic cancer, but there is a common and serious complication such as radiation-induced enteritis. Probiotics is reported to have positive effects against radiation-induced enteropathy. In this study, morphological changes of bowel mucosa were analyzed in rats to presume the effect of probiotics on radiation-induced enteritis and its correlation with radiation dose. A total of 48 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received a solution containing 1.0×10(8) colony-forming units of Lactiobacillus acidophilus or water once daily for 10 days. Each of two groups was divided into three subgroups and abdomino-pelvic area of each subgroup was irradiated with 10, 15, and 20 Gy, respectively on the seventh day of feeding the solutions. All rats were sacrificed 3 days after irradiation and the mucosal thickness and villus height of jejunum, ileum and colon were measured. The morphological parameters of the small intestine represented significant differences between two solution groups irradiated 10 or 15 Gy, except for villus height of jejunum in 15 Gy-subgroup (P=0.065). There was no significant morphometric difference between two groups irradiated with 20 Gy of radiation. Probiotics appear to be effective for the morphological shortening of small intestinal mucosa damaged by radiation less than or equal to 15 Gy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus