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Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental soil and vegetables.

Hong S, Kim K, Yoon S, Park WY, Sim S, Yu JR - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: Cryptosporidium is transmitted to hosts via consumption of contaminated water and food but also by direct contact with contaminated soil or infected hosts.Eleven of 34 locations (32.4%) and 3 of 24 vegetable samples (12.5%) were contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum, as confirmed by TaqI enzyme digestion of qPCR products and DNA sequencing.Therefore, it is necessary to reduce contamination of this organism in view of public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology & Research Institute of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that causes cryptosporidial enteritis. Numerous outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been reported worldwide. Cryptosporidium is transmitted to hosts via consumption of contaminated water and food but also by direct contact with contaminated soil or infected hosts. The present study investigated farm soil collected from 34 locations along the western Korean peninsula and 24 vegetables purchased from local grocery markets in Seoul. The soil and vegetable samples were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to estimate the risk of infection. Eleven of 34 locations (32.4%) and 3 of 24 vegetable samples (12.5%) were contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum, as confirmed by TaqI enzyme digestion of qPCR products and DNA sequencing. It is suggested that Cryptosporidium infection can be mediated via farm soil and vegetables. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce contamination of this organism in view of public health.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Locations of the surveyed areas. (a) Hwaseong-si, (b) Seosan-si, (c) Hongsung-gun, (d) Boryeong-si, (e) Seocheon-gun, (f) Gunsan-si, (g) Buan-gun.
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Figure 1: Locations of the surveyed areas. (a) Hwaseong-si, (b) Seosan-si, (c) Hongsung-gun, (d) Boryeong-si, (e) Seocheon-gun, (f) Gunsan-si, (g) Buan-gun.

Mentions: Soil samples were collected from 7 different localities along the western part of the Korean peninsula in January 2012 (Fig. 1). Soil (20 g) taken from each locality was mixed with 500 mL of filtered (0.22 µm) distilled water and centrifuged at 2,000×g for 20 min in an ultracentrifuge (Sorvall®Plus, Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA) after sieving through a gauze. The pellet was transferred to a 50-mL tube, washed in distilled water, and centrifuged again at 2,000×g for 20 min. The supernatant was discarded and 40 mL of distilled water was added to the pellet and mixed well. Only 1 mL of the mixed solution was taken and transferred into a microcentrifuge tube and centrifuged at 2,000×g for 10 min in a microcentrifuge (5415R, Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany). The pellet was collected and stored at 4℃ until the DNA was purified.


Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental soil and vegetables.

Hong S, Kim K, Yoon S, Park WY, Sim S, Yu JR - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Locations of the surveyed areas. (a) Hwaseong-si, (b) Seosan-si, (c) Hongsung-gun, (d) Boryeong-si, (e) Seocheon-gun, (f) Gunsan-si, (g) Buan-gun.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214936&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of the surveyed areas. (a) Hwaseong-si, (b) Seosan-si, (c) Hongsung-gun, (d) Boryeong-si, (e) Seocheon-gun, (f) Gunsan-si, (g) Buan-gun.
Mentions: Soil samples were collected from 7 different localities along the western part of the Korean peninsula in January 2012 (Fig. 1). Soil (20 g) taken from each locality was mixed with 500 mL of filtered (0.22 µm) distilled water and centrifuged at 2,000×g for 20 min in an ultracentrifuge (Sorvall®Plus, Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA) after sieving through a gauze. The pellet was transferred to a 50-mL tube, washed in distilled water, and centrifuged again at 2,000×g for 20 min. The supernatant was discarded and 40 mL of distilled water was added to the pellet and mixed well. Only 1 mL of the mixed solution was taken and transferred into a microcentrifuge tube and centrifuged at 2,000×g for 10 min in a microcentrifuge (5415R, Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany). The pellet was collected and stored at 4℃ until the DNA was purified.

Bottom Line: Cryptosporidium is transmitted to hosts via consumption of contaminated water and food but also by direct contact with contaminated soil or infected hosts.Eleven of 34 locations (32.4%) and 3 of 24 vegetable samples (12.5%) were contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum, as confirmed by TaqI enzyme digestion of qPCR products and DNA sequencing.Therefore, it is necessary to reduce contamination of this organism in view of public health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology & Research Institute of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that causes cryptosporidial enteritis. Numerous outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been reported worldwide. Cryptosporidium is transmitted to hosts via consumption of contaminated water and food but also by direct contact with contaminated soil or infected hosts. The present study investigated farm soil collected from 34 locations along the western Korean peninsula and 24 vegetables purchased from local grocery markets in Seoul. The soil and vegetable samples were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to estimate the risk of infection. Eleven of 34 locations (32.4%) and 3 of 24 vegetable samples (12.5%) were contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum, as confirmed by TaqI enzyme digestion of qPCR products and DNA sequencing. It is suggested that Cryptosporidium infection can be mediated via farm soil and vegetables. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce contamination of this organism in view of public health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus