Limits...
Changes in the cesarean section rate in Korea (1982-2012) and a review of the associated factors.

Chung SH, Seol HJ, Choi YS, Oh SY, Kim A, Bae CW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that countries with a no-fault compensation system maintained a lower CSR compared to that in countries with civil action, indicating the close relationship between the CSR and the medico-legal system within a country.The Korean government has implemented strategies including an incentive system relating to the CSR or encouraging vaginal birth after Cesarean to decrease CSR, but such strategies have proved ineffective.And from a national view point, reforming health care system, which could encourage the experienced obstetricians to be trained properly and be relieved from legal pressure with deliveries is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Although Cesarean section (CS) itself has contributed to the reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality, an undue rise in the CS rate (CSR) has been issued in Korea as well as globally. The CSR in Korea increased over the past two decades, but has remained at approximately 36% since 2006. Contributing factors associated with the CSR in Korea were an improvement in socio-economic status, a higher maternal age, a rise in multiple pregnancies, and maternal obesity. We found that countries with a no-fault compensation system maintained a lower CSR compared to that in countries with civil action, indicating the close relationship between the CSR and the medico-legal system within a country. The Korean government has implemented strategies including an incentive system relating to the CSR or encouraging vaginal birth after Cesarean to decrease CSR, but such strategies have proved ineffective. To optimize the CSR in Korea, efforts on lowering the maternal childbearing age or reducing maternal obesity are needed at individual level. And from a national view point, reforming health care system, which could encourage the experienced obstetricians to be trained properly and be relieved from legal pressure with deliveries is necessary.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Maternal age at birth in the USA, England, and Korea in 2012 (10, 14, 15). The mean maternal age was higher in Korea (31.6 yr) compared to that in the USA (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr) in 2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214933&req=5

Figure 2: Maternal age at birth in the USA, England, and Korea in 2012 (10, 14, 15). The mean maternal age was higher in Korea (31.6 yr) compared to that in the USA (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr) in 2012.

Mentions: Fig. 2 demonstrates the maternal age at birth in the United States, England, and Korea (10, 14, 15). The percentage of women aged 30-34 yr is 25.6% for the United States and 29.3% for England, but Korea shows a very high percentage at 49.4%. Korea also shows the highest percentage (16.3%) of women aged 35-39 yr among three countries and higher mean maternal age (31.6 yr) than the United States (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr).


Changes in the cesarean section rate in Korea (1982-2012) and a review of the associated factors.

Chung SH, Seol HJ, Choi YS, Oh SY, Kim A, Bae CW - J. Korean Med. Sci. (2014)

Maternal age at birth in the USA, England, and Korea in 2012 (10, 14, 15). The mean maternal age was higher in Korea (31.6 yr) compared to that in the USA (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr) in 2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214933&req=5

Figure 2: Maternal age at birth in the USA, England, and Korea in 2012 (10, 14, 15). The mean maternal age was higher in Korea (31.6 yr) compared to that in the USA (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr) in 2012.
Mentions: Fig. 2 demonstrates the maternal age at birth in the United States, England, and Korea (10, 14, 15). The percentage of women aged 30-34 yr is 25.6% for the United States and 29.3% for England, but Korea shows a very high percentage at 49.4%. Korea also shows the highest percentage (16.3%) of women aged 35-39 yr among three countries and higher mean maternal age (31.6 yr) than the United States (25.8 yr) and England (29.8 yr).

Bottom Line: We found that countries with a no-fault compensation system maintained a lower CSR compared to that in countries with civil action, indicating the close relationship between the CSR and the medico-legal system within a country.The Korean government has implemented strategies including an incentive system relating to the CSR or encouraging vaginal birth after Cesarean to decrease CSR, but such strategies have proved ineffective.And from a national view point, reforming health care system, which could encourage the experienced obstetricians to be trained properly and be relieved from legal pressure with deliveries is necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Although Cesarean section (CS) itself has contributed to the reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality, an undue rise in the CS rate (CSR) has been issued in Korea as well as globally. The CSR in Korea increased over the past two decades, but has remained at approximately 36% since 2006. Contributing factors associated with the CSR in Korea were an improvement in socio-economic status, a higher maternal age, a rise in multiple pregnancies, and maternal obesity. We found that countries with a no-fault compensation system maintained a lower CSR compared to that in countries with civil action, indicating the close relationship between the CSR and the medico-legal system within a country. The Korean government has implemented strategies including an incentive system relating to the CSR or encouraging vaginal birth after Cesarean to decrease CSR, but such strategies have proved ineffective. To optimize the CSR in Korea, efforts on lowering the maternal childbearing age or reducing maternal obesity are needed at individual level. And from a national view point, reforming health care system, which could encourage the experienced obstetricians to be trained properly and be relieved from legal pressure with deliveries is necessary.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus