Limits...
The microenvironment matters.

Weaver VM - Mol. Biol. Cell (2014)

Bottom Line: The physical and biochemical properties of the microenvironment regulate cell behavior and modulate tissue development and homeostasis.Likewise, the physical and interpersonal cues a trainee receives profoundly influence his or her scientific development, research perspective, and future success.My cell biology career has been greatly impacted by the flavor of the scientific environments I have trained within and the diverse research mentoring I have received.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, Department of Surgery, and Departments of Anatomy and Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, and UCSF Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 Valerie.Weaver@ucsfmedctr.org.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Scanning angle interference microscopy reveals impact of tissue mechanics on integrin adhesion organization. Joint University of California, San Francisco/Berkeley Bioengineering graduate students Luke Cassereau (left) and Matthew Rubashkin (right) and Valerie Weaver conduct supraresolution imaging studies using scanning angle interference microscopy to explore the interplay between integrin adhesions and tissue mechanics in metastatic breast cancer cells.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214768&req=5

Figure 4: Scanning angle interference microscopy reveals impact of tissue mechanics on integrin adhesion organization. Joint University of California, San Francisco/Berkeley Bioengineering graduate students Luke Cassereau (left) and Matthew Rubashkin (right) and Valerie Weaver conduct supraresolution imaging studies using scanning angle interference microscopy to explore the interplay between integrin adhesions and tissue mechanics in metastatic breast cancer cells.

Mentions: Mentoring is one of the privileges and pleasures of being an academic researcher. The joy that I have experienced when one of my students has passed a qualification exam or obtained his or her PhD or when one of my postdoctoral fellows has secured a permanent job and established his or her independence is wonderful. The fun I have interacting with my trainees sustains and nurtures me in multiple ways, and I am constantly learning and being challenged by them (Figure 3). I view the laboratory community I have created as a microcosm of an ideal world in which scientists of all genders, races, and backgrounds and from different disciplines work together to solve key biological questions (Figure 4). Of course, mentoring scientists from different disciplines and team building are not without their challenges, as one struggles with different sensibilities, scientific languages, and perspectives. However, the rewards are many, and I believe that we are united by common goals, including a love of knowledge and an appreciation for the beauty of cell biology and the precision of engineering and the elegance and logic of physics that continue to challenge and motivate us toward the next discovery and the next new concept.


The microenvironment matters.

Weaver VM - Mol. Biol. Cell (2014)

Scanning angle interference microscopy reveals impact of tissue mechanics on integrin adhesion organization. Joint University of California, San Francisco/Berkeley Bioengineering graduate students Luke Cassereau (left) and Matthew Rubashkin (right) and Valerie Weaver conduct supraresolution imaging studies using scanning angle interference microscopy to explore the interplay between integrin adhesions and tissue mechanics in metastatic breast cancer cells.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214768&req=5

Figure 4: Scanning angle interference microscopy reveals impact of tissue mechanics on integrin adhesion organization. Joint University of California, San Francisco/Berkeley Bioengineering graduate students Luke Cassereau (left) and Matthew Rubashkin (right) and Valerie Weaver conduct supraresolution imaging studies using scanning angle interference microscopy to explore the interplay between integrin adhesions and tissue mechanics in metastatic breast cancer cells.
Mentions: Mentoring is one of the privileges and pleasures of being an academic researcher. The joy that I have experienced when one of my students has passed a qualification exam or obtained his or her PhD or when one of my postdoctoral fellows has secured a permanent job and established his or her independence is wonderful. The fun I have interacting with my trainees sustains and nurtures me in multiple ways, and I am constantly learning and being challenged by them (Figure 3). I view the laboratory community I have created as a microcosm of an ideal world in which scientists of all genders, races, and backgrounds and from different disciplines work together to solve key biological questions (Figure 4). Of course, mentoring scientists from different disciplines and team building are not without their challenges, as one struggles with different sensibilities, scientific languages, and perspectives. However, the rewards are many, and I believe that we are united by common goals, including a love of knowledge and an appreciation for the beauty of cell biology and the precision of engineering and the elegance and logic of physics that continue to challenge and motivate us toward the next discovery and the next new concept.

Bottom Line: The physical and biochemical properties of the microenvironment regulate cell behavior and modulate tissue development and homeostasis.Likewise, the physical and interpersonal cues a trainee receives profoundly influence his or her scientific development, research perspective, and future success.My cell biology career has been greatly impacted by the flavor of the scientific environments I have trained within and the diverse research mentoring I have received.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Bioengineering and Tissue Regeneration, Department of Surgery, and Departments of Anatomy and Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, and UCSF Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 Valerie.Weaver@ucsfmedctr.org.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus