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Identifying the core components of emotional intelligence: evidence from amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations during resting state.

Pan W, Wang T, Wang X, Hitchman G, Wang L, Chen A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite much attention being paid to the neural substrates of EI, little is known of the spontaneous brain activity associated with EI during resting state.We found that EI was significantly associated with ALFFs in key nodes of two networks: the social emotional processing network (the fusiform gyrus, right superior orbital frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule) and the cognitive control network (the bilateral pre-SMA, cerebellum and right precuneus).These findings suggest that the neural correlates of EI involve several brain regions in two crucial networks, which reflect the core components of EI: emotion perception and emotional control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education), Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Emotional intelligence (EI) is a multi-faceted construct consisting of our ability to perceive, monitor, regulate and use emotions. Despite much attention being paid to the neural substrates of EI, little is known of the spontaneous brain activity associated with EI during resting state. We used resting-state fMRI to investigate the association between the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) and EI in a large sample of young, healthy adults. We found that EI was significantly associated with ALFFs in key nodes of two networks: the social emotional processing network (the fusiform gyrus, right superior orbital frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule) and the cognitive control network (the bilateral pre-SMA, cerebellum and right precuneus). These findings suggest that the neural correlates of EI involve several brain regions in two crucial networks, which reflect the core components of EI: emotion perception and emotional control.

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Scatter plots of the relationships between WLEIS total score and mean ALFF values in the significant clusters.A, B, C, D and E showed significant correlations between EI total score and mean ALFFs in left PCC, bilateral SMA/pre-SMA, right precuneus, right cerebellum and right fusiform gyrus, respectively.
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pone-0111435-g002: Scatter plots of the relationships between WLEIS total score and mean ALFF values in the significant clusters.A, B, C, D and E showed significant correlations between EI total score and mean ALFFs in left PCC, bilateral SMA/pre-SMA, right precuneus, right cerebellum and right fusiform gyrus, respectively.

Mentions: We performed regression analysis to explore the correlations between the brain's regional spontaneous activity and EI. As shown in Figure 1, Figure 2 and Table 2, EI total scores were positively correlated with ALFFs in the left PCC (rpeak  = 0.38, rcluster  = 0.37, ps <0.001), bilateral SMA (mainly the pre-SMA; rpeak  = 0.37, rcluster  = 0.46, ps <0.001) and right precuneus (rpeak  = 0.29, rcluster  = 0.34, ps <0.001), and negatively correlated with ALFFs in the right cerebellum (rpeak  =  −0.41, rcluster  =  −0.39, ps <0.001) and right fusiform gyrus (rpeak =  −0.29, p<0.001; rcluster  =  −0.22, p<0.005).


Identifying the core components of emotional intelligence: evidence from amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations during resting state.

Pan W, Wang T, Wang X, Hitchman G, Wang L, Chen A - PLoS ONE (2014)

Scatter plots of the relationships between WLEIS total score and mean ALFF values in the significant clusters.A, B, C, D and E showed significant correlations between EI total score and mean ALFFs in left PCC, bilateral SMA/pre-SMA, right precuneus, right cerebellum and right fusiform gyrus, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214743&req=5

pone-0111435-g002: Scatter plots of the relationships between WLEIS total score and mean ALFF values in the significant clusters.A, B, C, D and E showed significant correlations between EI total score and mean ALFFs in left PCC, bilateral SMA/pre-SMA, right precuneus, right cerebellum and right fusiform gyrus, respectively.
Mentions: We performed regression analysis to explore the correlations between the brain's regional spontaneous activity and EI. As shown in Figure 1, Figure 2 and Table 2, EI total scores were positively correlated with ALFFs in the left PCC (rpeak  = 0.38, rcluster  = 0.37, ps <0.001), bilateral SMA (mainly the pre-SMA; rpeak  = 0.37, rcluster  = 0.46, ps <0.001) and right precuneus (rpeak  = 0.29, rcluster  = 0.34, ps <0.001), and negatively correlated with ALFFs in the right cerebellum (rpeak  =  −0.41, rcluster  =  −0.39, ps <0.001) and right fusiform gyrus (rpeak =  −0.29, p<0.001; rcluster  =  −0.22, p<0.005).

Bottom Line: Despite much attention being paid to the neural substrates of EI, little is known of the spontaneous brain activity associated with EI during resting state.We found that EI was significantly associated with ALFFs in key nodes of two networks: the social emotional processing network (the fusiform gyrus, right superior orbital frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule) and the cognitive control network (the bilateral pre-SMA, cerebellum and right precuneus).These findings suggest that the neural correlates of EI involve several brain regions in two crucial networks, which reflect the core components of EI: emotion perception and emotional control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Cognition and Personality (Ministry of Education), Faculty of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing, China.

ABSTRACT
Emotional intelligence (EI) is a multi-faceted construct consisting of our ability to perceive, monitor, regulate and use emotions. Despite much attention being paid to the neural substrates of EI, little is known of the spontaneous brain activity associated with EI during resting state. We used resting-state fMRI to investigate the association between the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) and EI in a large sample of young, healthy adults. We found that EI was significantly associated with ALFFs in key nodes of two networks: the social emotional processing network (the fusiform gyrus, right superior orbital frontal gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus and left inferior parietal lobule) and the cognitive control network (the bilateral pre-SMA, cerebellum and right precuneus). These findings suggest that the neural correlates of EI involve several brain regions in two crucial networks, which reflect the core components of EI: emotion perception and emotional control.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus