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Bisphenol A exposure and asthma development in school-age children: a longitudinal study.

Kim KN, Kim JH, Kwon HJ, Hong SJ, Kim BJ, Lee SY, Hong YC, Bae S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that exposure to bisphenol A in school-age children was associated with wheezing and asthma.Bisphenol A was also negatively associated with PC20 (ß = -2.33; P = .02).Increased urinary bisphenol A concentrations at 7-8 years old were positively associated with wheezing and asthma and negatively associated with PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the effect of bisphenol A on various health outcomes has been extensively examined, few studies have investigated its effect on asthma.

Objective: We hypothesized that exposure to bisphenol A in school-age children was associated with wheezing and asthma.

Methods: Participants included 127 children aged 7-8 years without a previous asthma diagnosis in an elementary school in Seoul, Korea. Three surveys were conducted, each 2 years apart. Bisphenol A concentration was measured at the baseline survey, and PC20, which is defined as the methacholine concentration that induces a decrease in FEV1 of 20% from baseline, was measured at every survey. Associations between bisphenol A concentration at 7-8 years of age and wheezing, asthma, and PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years were examined using generalized estimating equations, a marginal Cox regression model, and a linear mixed model.

Results: The log-transformed creatinine-adjusted urinary bisphenol A concentration at 7-8 years was positively associated with wheezing (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.31; P = .02) and asthma (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.00; P<.001) at ages up to 11-12 years. Bisphenol A was also negatively associated with PC20 (ß = -2.33; P = .02). When stratified by sex, the association between bisphenol A and asthma remained significant only in girls (hazard ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.18-2.76; P<.001).

Conclusion: Increased urinary bisphenol A concentrations at 7-8 years old were positively associated with wheezing and asthma and negatively associated with PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of study population sampling and follow-up.
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pone-0111383-g001: Overview of study population sampling and follow-up.

Mentions: In 2005, all the 1st grade (n = 92) and 2nd grade children (n = 96) in an elementary school in Seoul, Korea, were invited to the study. Of a total of 188 children aged 7–8 years, parents of 153 schoolchildren agreed to enroll for the baseline survey, which consisted of a methacholine challenge test, urinary BPA measurement, and the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire, answered by the parents or guardian. Of the original sample, the participants without a BPA measurement (n = 16) or with a previous asthma diagnosis (n = 10) at baseline were subsequently excluded from the analysis, resulting in 127 children. In 2007, 125 of the 127 children who were then aged 9–10 years participated in the first follow-up survey, and, in 2009, all of the original 127 children who were then aged 11–12 years participated in the second follow-up survey (Figure 1). The follow-up surveys consisted of the ISAAC questionnaire and the methacholine challenge test.


Bisphenol A exposure and asthma development in school-age children: a longitudinal study.

Kim KN, Kim JH, Kwon HJ, Hong SJ, Kim BJ, Lee SY, Hong YC, Bae S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Overview of study population sampling and follow-up.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214730&req=5

pone-0111383-g001: Overview of study population sampling and follow-up.
Mentions: In 2005, all the 1st grade (n = 92) and 2nd grade children (n = 96) in an elementary school in Seoul, Korea, were invited to the study. Of a total of 188 children aged 7–8 years, parents of 153 schoolchildren agreed to enroll for the baseline survey, which consisted of a methacholine challenge test, urinary BPA measurement, and the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire, answered by the parents or guardian. Of the original sample, the participants without a BPA measurement (n = 16) or with a previous asthma diagnosis (n = 10) at baseline were subsequently excluded from the analysis, resulting in 127 children. In 2007, 125 of the 127 children who were then aged 9–10 years participated in the first follow-up survey, and, in 2009, all of the original 127 children who were then aged 11–12 years participated in the second follow-up survey (Figure 1). The follow-up surveys consisted of the ISAAC questionnaire and the methacholine challenge test.

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that exposure to bisphenol A in school-age children was associated with wheezing and asthma.Bisphenol A was also negatively associated with PC20 (ß = -2.33; P = .02).Increased urinary bisphenol A concentrations at 7-8 years old were positively associated with wheezing and asthma and negatively associated with PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the effect of bisphenol A on various health outcomes has been extensively examined, few studies have investigated its effect on asthma.

Objective: We hypothesized that exposure to bisphenol A in school-age children was associated with wheezing and asthma.

Methods: Participants included 127 children aged 7-8 years without a previous asthma diagnosis in an elementary school in Seoul, Korea. Three surveys were conducted, each 2 years apart. Bisphenol A concentration was measured at the baseline survey, and PC20, which is defined as the methacholine concentration that induces a decrease in FEV1 of 20% from baseline, was measured at every survey. Associations between bisphenol A concentration at 7-8 years of age and wheezing, asthma, and PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years were examined using generalized estimating equations, a marginal Cox regression model, and a linear mixed model.

Results: The log-transformed creatinine-adjusted urinary bisphenol A concentration at 7-8 years was positively associated with wheezing (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-5.31; P = .02) and asthma (hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.51-3.00; P<.001) at ages up to 11-12 years. Bisphenol A was also negatively associated with PC20 (ß = -2.33; P = .02). When stratified by sex, the association between bisphenol A and asthma remained significant only in girls (hazard ratio, 2.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.18-2.76; P<.001).

Conclusion: Increased urinary bisphenol A concentrations at 7-8 years old were positively associated with wheezing and asthma and negatively associated with PC20 at ages up to 11-12 years.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus