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Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

Trangmar SJ, Chiesa ST, Stock CG, Kalsi KK, Secher NH, González-Alonso J - J. Physiol. (Lond.) (2014)

Bottom Line: In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature.In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity.However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sports Medicine and Human Performance, Brunel University, London, UK.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental arrangement and ultrasound recordingPhoto depicting one of the participants in the study performing an incremental cycling test on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer (Lode Angio, Groningen, the Netherlands) with a backrest inclination of 45 deg, while measurements of ICA and CCA blood flow were obtained at each stage. Representative images of real time ICA blood velocity recordings at rest, submaximal and peak exercise are shown.
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fig02: Experimental arrangement and ultrasound recordingPhoto depicting one of the participants in the study performing an incremental cycling test on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer (Lode Angio, Groningen, the Netherlands) with a backrest inclination of 45 deg, while measurements of ICA and CCA blood flow were obtained at each stage. Representative images of real time ICA blood velocity recordings at rest, submaximal and peak exercise are shown.

Mentions: The experimental days (visits 4 and 5) included three semi-recumbent incremental cycling exercise tests consisting of five 3 min stages of increasing intensities to WRmax (Figs 1 and 2). In the first experimental trial, incremental cycling was completed in the following conditions: (1) in a ‘control’, hydrated state; (2) ‘dehydrated’ (DEH), ∼5 min after 2 h of submaximal cycling without fluid ingestion; and (3) rehydrated (REH), after 1 h recovery with full fluid replacement. Work rates for control and REH were the same (67 ± 3, 134 ± 5, 202 ± 8, 269 ± 11 and 336 ± 14 W, corresponding to 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% of WRmax) but in anticipation of a reduced exercise capacity when dehydrated, WR in DEH was reduced by 20% to maintain the same number of exercise stages and test duration with work rates set at 54 ± 2, 108 ± 4, 161 ± 7, 215 ± 9 and 269 ± 11 W, respectively. In the second experimental trial (i.e. euhydration trial), carried out on a separate day, participants completed the same incremental and prolonged exercise protocols, but hydration was maintained through fluid ingestion according to the body mass loss. Fluid was provided in aliquots of ∼160 ml every 10 min during the 2 h of submaximal exercise and also pre- and post-incremental exercise at the same work rates. The euhydration trial was used to isolate the effect of dehydration on the observed haemodynamic responses to incremental exercise and to control for the effect of repeated exercise. In both trials, incremental exercise was performed in the heat (35°C, RH 50%) with pedal cadence maintained between 70 and 90 r.p.m. Participants were exposed to the environmental conditions for 1 h prior to commencement of the protocol.


Dehydration affects cerebral blood flow but not its metabolic rate for oxygen during maximal exercise in trained humans.

Trangmar SJ, Chiesa ST, Stock CG, Kalsi KK, Secher NH, González-Alonso J - J. Physiol. (Lond.) (2014)

Experimental arrangement and ultrasound recordingPhoto depicting one of the participants in the study performing an incremental cycling test on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer (Lode Angio, Groningen, the Netherlands) with a backrest inclination of 45 deg, while measurements of ICA and CCA blood flow were obtained at each stage. Representative images of real time ICA blood velocity recordings at rest, submaximal and peak exercise are shown.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214665&req=5

fig02: Experimental arrangement and ultrasound recordingPhoto depicting one of the participants in the study performing an incremental cycling test on a semi-recumbent cycle ergometer (Lode Angio, Groningen, the Netherlands) with a backrest inclination of 45 deg, while measurements of ICA and CCA blood flow were obtained at each stage. Representative images of real time ICA blood velocity recordings at rest, submaximal and peak exercise are shown.
Mentions: The experimental days (visits 4 and 5) included three semi-recumbent incremental cycling exercise tests consisting of five 3 min stages of increasing intensities to WRmax (Figs 1 and 2). In the first experimental trial, incremental cycling was completed in the following conditions: (1) in a ‘control’, hydrated state; (2) ‘dehydrated’ (DEH), ∼5 min after 2 h of submaximal cycling without fluid ingestion; and (3) rehydrated (REH), after 1 h recovery with full fluid replacement. Work rates for control and REH were the same (67 ± 3, 134 ± 5, 202 ± 8, 269 ± 11 and 336 ± 14 W, corresponding to 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% of WRmax) but in anticipation of a reduced exercise capacity when dehydrated, WR in DEH was reduced by 20% to maintain the same number of exercise stages and test duration with work rates set at 54 ± 2, 108 ± 4, 161 ± 7, 215 ± 9 and 269 ± 11 W, respectively. In the second experimental trial (i.e. euhydration trial), carried out on a separate day, participants completed the same incremental and prolonged exercise protocols, but hydration was maintained through fluid ingestion according to the body mass loss. Fluid was provided in aliquots of ∼160 ml every 10 min during the 2 h of submaximal exercise and also pre- and post-incremental exercise at the same work rates. The euhydration trial was used to isolate the effect of dehydration on the observed haemodynamic responses to incremental exercise and to control for the effect of repeated exercise. In both trials, incremental exercise was performed in the heat (35°C, RH 50%) with pedal cadence maintained between 70 and 90 r.p.m. Participants were exposed to the environmental conditions for 1 h prior to commencement of the protocol.

Bottom Line: In all conditions, reductions in ICA and MCA Vmean were associated with declining cerebral vascular conductance, increasing jugular venous noradrenaline, and falling arterial carbon dioxide tension (P aCO 2) (R(2) ≥ 0.41, P ≤ 0.01) whereas CCA flow and conductance were related to elevated blood temperature.In conclusion, dehydration accelerated the decline in CBF by decreasing P aCO 2 and enhancing vasoconstrictor activity.However, the circulatory strain on the human brain during maximal exercise does not compromise CMRO2 because of compensatory increases in O2 extraction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sports Medicine and Human Performance, Brunel University, London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus