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Health policies to control Chagas disease transmission in European countries.

Requena-Méndez A, Albajar-Viñas P, Angheben A, Chiodini P, Gascón J, Muñoz J, Chagas Disease COHEMI Working Gro - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB, Hospital Clínic-Universitat de Barcelona), Barcelona, Spain.

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In collaboration with WHO, a research group working on migrant health, COHEMI, (COordinating resources to assess and improve HEalth status of MIgrants from Latin America) has undertaken this study aimed at reviewing the health policies implemented in European Union countries with the highest disease prevalence, plus Switzerland, to control the transmission of CD through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and the congenital route... A map illustrating the measures currently implemented to control transmission in European countries (blood banks, organ transplantation, and congenital transmission) at the national and subnational levels was built... In these documents, individuals known to be infected with T. cruzi are specifically mentioned and defined as an exclusion criteria for blood donation... However, these directives do not specify which measures must be taken for those donors who were potentially exposed to T. cruzi infection in the past but who have not yet been tested... In these four regions, a T. cruzi test must be done as a part of the required screening tests undertaken during antenatal care... When pregnant women test positive, newborns are tested for congenital Chagas disease and treated early if found to be infected with T. cruzi or followed up for at least nine months until the infection can be reliably ruled out... In Sweden, where systematic screening has not been implemented in blood banks, but all individuals who lived more than five years in Chagas disease–endemic countries are systematically excluded from donation, the risk of disease transmission through transfusion is substantially reduced, but gaps remain in this regulation such as in the case of donors whose mothers were born in endemic areas... For the rest of the European countries, the official directives either exclude donations only in patients confirmed to be infected, or do not apply any measure... The problem is that the majority of chronically infected people either do not show any symptoms or have symptoms that simulate other conditions; therefore, the possibility of CD might not be suspected... With regards to health policies for solid organ transplantation, no country has a specific directive or legislation that considers Chagas disease in all patients at risk... Even the EU directives do not specifically mention T. cruzi infection as a potential risk for recipients of solid organ transplants... To ensure control of Chagas disease transmission in European countries, changes in some laws and directives concerning blood banks and transplant programmes are urgently needed to avoid or reduce the risk of transmission... Finally, programmes to control congenital Chagas disease should be implemented in all European countries based on the screening of pregnant women at risk of the infection, with the primary objective of treating infected newborns at an early stage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transplantation health policy on T. cruzi infection in EU countries and Switzerland.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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pntd-0003245-g003: Transplantation health policy on T. cruzi infection in EU countries and Switzerland.

Mentions: The data obtained are shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3 and summarized in the following paragraphs.


Health policies to control Chagas disease transmission in European countries.

Requena-Méndez A, Albajar-Viñas P, Angheben A, Chiodini P, Gascón J, Muñoz J, Chagas Disease COHEMI Working Gro - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Transplantation health policy on T. cruzi infection in EU countries and Switzerland.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214631&req=5

pntd-0003245-g003: Transplantation health policy on T. cruzi infection in EU countries and Switzerland.
Mentions: The data obtained are shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3 and summarized in the following paragraphs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB, Hospital Clínic-Universitat de Barcelona), Barcelona, Spain.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

In collaboration with WHO, a research group working on migrant health, COHEMI, (COordinating resources to assess and improve HEalth status of MIgrants from Latin America) has undertaken this study aimed at reviewing the health policies implemented in European Union countries with the highest disease prevalence, plus Switzerland, to control the transmission of CD through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, and the congenital route... A map illustrating the measures currently implemented to control transmission in European countries (blood banks, organ transplantation, and congenital transmission) at the national and subnational levels was built... In these documents, individuals known to be infected with T. cruzi are specifically mentioned and defined as an exclusion criteria for blood donation... However, these directives do not specify which measures must be taken for those donors who were potentially exposed to T. cruzi infection in the past but who have not yet been tested... In these four regions, a T. cruzi test must be done as a part of the required screening tests undertaken during antenatal care... When pregnant women test positive, newborns are tested for congenital Chagas disease and treated early if found to be infected with T. cruzi or followed up for at least nine months until the infection can be reliably ruled out... In Sweden, where systematic screening has not been implemented in blood banks, but all individuals who lived more than five years in Chagas disease–endemic countries are systematically excluded from donation, the risk of disease transmission through transfusion is substantially reduced, but gaps remain in this regulation such as in the case of donors whose mothers were born in endemic areas... For the rest of the European countries, the official directives either exclude donations only in patients confirmed to be infected, or do not apply any measure... The problem is that the majority of chronically infected people either do not show any symptoms or have symptoms that simulate other conditions; therefore, the possibility of CD might not be suspected... With regards to health policies for solid organ transplantation, no country has a specific directive or legislation that considers Chagas disease in all patients at risk... Even the EU directives do not specifically mention T. cruzi infection as a potential risk for recipients of solid organ transplants... To ensure control of Chagas disease transmission in European countries, changes in some laws and directives concerning blood banks and transplant programmes are urgently needed to avoid or reduce the risk of transmission... Finally, programmes to control congenital Chagas disease should be implemented in all European countries based on the screening of pregnant women at risk of the infection, with the primary objective of treating infected newborns at an early stage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus