Limits...
Splenosis mimicking an extramural duodenal mass: A case report.

Deng Y, Jin Y, Li F, Zhou Y - Oncol Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: Splenosis is frequently observed in the abdomen and pelvic cavity and may mimic malignancy on imaging, often leading to unnecessary surgical intervention.The aim of this report is to raise the awareness of this entity in patients post-splenectomy, to avoid unnecessary surgery, particularly with an increased prevalence of patients with previous splenic trauma due to road traffic accidents.Therefore, the possibility of abdominal splenosis must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal mass as the main clinical manifestation, where there is a history of splenic trauma or splenectomy and no other systemic symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biliary Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Splenosis is a common disease, patients with splenosis are generally asymptomatic and therapy is not indicated. Splenosis is frequently observed in the abdomen and pelvic cavity and may mimic malignancy on imaging, often leading to unnecessary surgical intervention. The current study presents the case of a 55-year-old female patient, with a rare case of duodenal splenosis, who underwent unnecessary laparotomy due to a misdiagnosis of a malignant duodenal stromal tumor. Although splenosis was confirmed by intraoperative tissue biopsy, this mass was resected due to the lack of information with regard to this condition, an increased suspicion of progressive growth of the mass and chronic duodenal compression. The aim of this report is to raise the awareness of this entity in patients post-splenectomy, to avoid unnecessary surgery, particularly with an increased prevalence of patients with previous splenic trauma due to road traffic accidents. Therefore, the possibility of abdominal splenosis must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal mass as the main clinical manifestation, where there is a history of splenic trauma or splenectomy and no other systemic symptoms. In the future noninvasive nuclear scintigraphy may serve as a suitable diagnostic approach for splenosis, thereby avoiding unnecessary laparotomies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT imaging of the abdomen. CT imaging in the (A) arterial and (B) portal phases revealed no spleen and a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm mass (arrows) arising from the duodenal bulb, mimicking a duodenal tumor.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214512&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2811: CT imaging of the abdomen. CT imaging in the (A) arterial and (B) portal phases revealed no spleen and a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm mass (arrows) arising from the duodenal bulb, mimicking a duodenal tumor.

Mentions: A 55-year-old female was admitted to the Department of Biliary Surgery, West China Hospital (Chengdu, China) with a history of duodenal mass, which was identified following a routine physical examination in a local hospital. No systemic symptoms were observed and there was no history of malignancy or weight loss. The patient had a history of splenectomy following a traumatic spleen rupture due to a traffic accident 27 years previously. No history of drug and alcohol abuse was evident, the patient had a normal dietary history and had not previously visited the nomadic areas, where echinococcosis is prevalant. Physical examination and the initial laboratory tests at the West China Hospital revealed no abnormalities with the exception of the presence of a postoperative abdominal scar in the left upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasound revealed no visual spleen due to the splenectomy, and a hilar mass measuring 3.9×2.6×4.9 cm with a rich blood supply. Subsequent contrast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging showed no spleen and a mass with a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm, mass arising from the duodenal bulb (Fig. 1), which was considered to be a malignant duodenal stromal tumor.


Splenosis mimicking an extramural duodenal mass: A case report.

Deng Y, Jin Y, Li F, Zhou Y - Oncol Lett (2014)

CT imaging of the abdomen. CT imaging in the (A) arterial and (B) portal phases revealed no spleen and a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm mass (arrows) arising from the duodenal bulb, mimicking a duodenal tumor.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214512&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2811: CT imaging of the abdomen. CT imaging in the (A) arterial and (B) portal phases revealed no spleen and a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm mass (arrows) arising from the duodenal bulb, mimicking a duodenal tumor.
Mentions: A 55-year-old female was admitted to the Department of Biliary Surgery, West China Hospital (Chengdu, China) with a history of duodenal mass, which was identified following a routine physical examination in a local hospital. No systemic symptoms were observed and there was no history of malignancy or weight loss. The patient had a history of splenectomy following a traumatic spleen rupture due to a traffic accident 27 years previously. No history of drug and alcohol abuse was evident, the patient had a normal dietary history and had not previously visited the nomadic areas, where echinococcosis is prevalant. Physical examination and the initial laboratory tests at the West China Hospital revealed no abnormalities with the exception of the presence of a postoperative abdominal scar in the left upper quadrant. Abdominal ultrasound revealed no visual spleen due to the splenectomy, and a hilar mass measuring 3.9×2.6×4.9 cm with a rich blood supply. Subsequent contrast helical computed tomography (CT) imaging showed no spleen and a mass with a maximum diameter of 6.1×3.6 cm, mass arising from the duodenal bulb (Fig. 1), which was considered to be a malignant duodenal stromal tumor.

Bottom Line: Splenosis is frequently observed in the abdomen and pelvic cavity and may mimic malignancy on imaging, often leading to unnecessary surgical intervention.The aim of this report is to raise the awareness of this entity in patients post-splenectomy, to avoid unnecessary surgery, particularly with an increased prevalence of patients with previous splenic trauma due to road traffic accidents.Therefore, the possibility of abdominal splenosis must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal mass as the main clinical manifestation, where there is a history of splenic trauma or splenectomy and no other systemic symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biliary Surgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Splenosis is a common disease, patients with splenosis are generally asymptomatic and therapy is not indicated. Splenosis is frequently observed in the abdomen and pelvic cavity and may mimic malignancy on imaging, often leading to unnecessary surgical intervention. The current study presents the case of a 55-year-old female patient, with a rare case of duodenal splenosis, who underwent unnecessary laparotomy due to a misdiagnosis of a malignant duodenal stromal tumor. Although splenosis was confirmed by intraoperative tissue biopsy, this mass was resected due to the lack of information with regard to this condition, an increased suspicion of progressive growth of the mass and chronic duodenal compression. The aim of this report is to raise the awareness of this entity in patients post-splenectomy, to avoid unnecessary surgery, particularly with an increased prevalence of patients with previous splenic trauma due to road traffic accidents. Therefore, the possibility of abdominal splenosis must be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal mass as the main clinical manifestation, where there is a history of splenic trauma or splenectomy and no other systemic symptoms. In the future noninvasive nuclear scintigraphy may serve as a suitable diagnostic approach for splenosis, thereby avoiding unnecessary laparotomies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus