Limits...
Facial nerve schwannoma: A case report and review of the literature.

Chen MC, Tseng TM, Hung SH, Chen PY - Oncol Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: The typical clinical presentation often includes ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, vertigo and tinnitus.In the present study, the case of a young male patient who presented with recurrent unilateral facial palsy without hearing impairment is presented.The patient's facial weakness recovered three weeks following treatment, however, the tumor subsequently grew.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 235, Taiwan, R.O.C.

ABSTRACT
A vestibular schwannoma, often termed an acoustic neuroma, is a type of benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The typical clinical presentation often includes ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, vertigo and tinnitus. In the present study, the case of a young male patient who presented with recurrent unilateral facial palsy without hearing impairment is presented. The patient was diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma and received steroidal treatment with prednisolone for two weeks. The patient's facial weakness recovered three weeks following treatment, however, the tumor subsequently grew. The patient then underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a margin dose of 13 Gy. Six months after the radiosurgery, the tumor was stable without progression, and the patient's facial nerve function and hearing remained intact.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Contrast-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals an intracanalicular tumor in the region of the cerebellopontine angle (shown by the arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214502&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2787: Contrast-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals an intracanalicular tumor in the region of the cerebellopontine angle (shown by the arrow).

Mentions: Pure tone audiometry did not reveal any hearing impairment and the patient’s speech recognition was 100% bilaterally. In addition, the auditory brainstem response appeared to be normal. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were symmetrical on either side. The caloric test revealed 38% right canal paresis, while facial electroneurography demonstrated 80% degeneration on the right side. The patient did not experience facial paresthesia or altered sensations of taste. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a mass (maximal diameter, 1.2 cm) in the right internal auditory canal (Fig. 1). No enhancement was observed at the labyrinthine portion of the facial nerve or at the geniculate ganglion.


Facial nerve schwannoma: A case report and review of the literature.

Chen MC, Tseng TM, Hung SH, Chen PY - Oncol Lett (2014)

Contrast-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals an intracanalicular tumor in the region of the cerebellopontine angle (shown by the arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214502&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2787: Contrast-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging reveals an intracanalicular tumor in the region of the cerebellopontine angle (shown by the arrow).
Mentions: Pure tone audiometry did not reveal any hearing impairment and the patient’s speech recognition was 100% bilaterally. In addition, the auditory brainstem response appeared to be normal. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were symmetrical on either side. The caloric test revealed 38% right canal paresis, while facial electroneurography demonstrated 80% degeneration on the right side. The patient did not experience facial paresthesia or altered sensations of taste. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a mass (maximal diameter, 1.2 cm) in the right internal auditory canal (Fig. 1). No enhancement was observed at the labyrinthine portion of the facial nerve or at the geniculate ganglion.

Bottom Line: The typical clinical presentation often includes ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, vertigo and tinnitus.In the present study, the case of a young male patient who presented with recurrent unilateral facial palsy without hearing impairment is presented.The patient's facial weakness recovered three weeks following treatment, however, the tumor subsequently grew.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 235, Taiwan, R.O.C.

ABSTRACT
A vestibular schwannoma, often termed an acoustic neuroma, is a type of benign primary intracranial tumor of the myelin-forming cells of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The typical clinical presentation often includes ipsilateral sensorineural hearing loss/deafness, vertigo and tinnitus. In the present study, the case of a young male patient who presented with recurrent unilateral facial palsy without hearing impairment is presented. The patient was diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma and received steroidal treatment with prednisolone for two weeks. The patient's facial weakness recovered three weeks following treatment, however, the tumor subsequently grew. The patient then underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery with a margin dose of 13 Gy. Six months after the radiosurgery, the tumor was stable without progression, and the patient's facial nerve function and hearing remained intact.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus