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Granular cell tumor of the breast during lactation: A case report and review of the literature.

Qian X, Chen Y, Wan F - Oncol Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: In this tsudy, the case of a 29-year old female who presented with a mass in the right breast is decribed.Immunohistochemical and cytological analysis revealed a GCT and subsequently wide local excision was performed.Further studies are required to explore the association between granular cell tumors and hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ningbo Medical Treatment Center, Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315000, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Granular cell tumor of the breast (GCTB) is a rare tumor, particularly in lactating women. This tumor can clinically and radiologically mimic breast carcinoma, which poses particular problems. The association between GCTB and sex hormones should receive particular attention. The present study reports a case of GCTB in a lactating patient. In this tsudy, the case of a 29-year old female who presented with a mass in the right breast is decribed. Immunohistochemical and cytological analysis revealed a GCT and subsequently wide local excision was performed. At 15 months following surgery, the patient is well and no tumor recurrence has been identified. A comprehensive review of the literature was also performed to assess and compare all cases of GCTB, with particular attention to hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states. Further studies are required to explore the association between granular cell tumors and hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasound of the lesion showing a definite hypoechoic mass with angular margins, spiculations and an acoustic shadow posterior to the mass.
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f2-ol-08-06-2565: Ultrasound of the lesion showing a definite hypoechoic mass with angular margins, spiculations and an acoustic shadow posterior to the mass.

Mentions: A 29-year-old female presented to the Women’s Hospital (Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China) with a mass on the right breast, which had first been noticed four years earlier. The mass had increased in size in the latter half of the gestation and lactation periods. The patient had no medical history of malignancy. A physical examination of the breast revealed a firm, painless and vague nodularity in the upper-outer quadrant, near the axillary tail. Mammography revealed an isodense right-sided mass with ill-defined borders [Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4C; Fig. 1]. Ultrasound examination demonstrated a 1.9×1.6×1.6-cm hypoechoic, hypovascular and poorly-defined mass (BI-RADS 5; Fig. 2). Dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) mammography revealed homogeneous enhancement on a post-gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging (MRI) sequence and a high signal rim on a T2-weighted sequence (Fig. 3). The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignancy.


Granular cell tumor of the breast during lactation: A case report and review of the literature.

Qian X, Chen Y, Wan F - Oncol Lett (2014)

Ultrasound of the lesion showing a definite hypoechoic mass with angular margins, spiculations and an acoustic shadow posterior to the mass.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214494&req=5

f2-ol-08-06-2565: Ultrasound of the lesion showing a definite hypoechoic mass with angular margins, spiculations and an acoustic shadow posterior to the mass.
Mentions: A 29-year-old female presented to the Women’s Hospital (Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China) with a mass on the right breast, which had first been noticed four years earlier. The mass had increased in size in the latter half of the gestation and lactation periods. The patient had no medical history of malignancy. A physical examination of the breast revealed a firm, painless and vague nodularity in the upper-outer quadrant, near the axillary tail. Mammography revealed an isodense right-sided mass with ill-defined borders [Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 4C; Fig. 1]. Ultrasound examination demonstrated a 1.9×1.6×1.6-cm hypoechoic, hypovascular and poorly-defined mass (BI-RADS 5; Fig. 2). Dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) mammography revealed homogeneous enhancement on a post-gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging (MRI) sequence and a high signal rim on a T2-weighted sequence (Fig. 3). The clinical and radiological findings were suggestive of malignancy.

Bottom Line: In this tsudy, the case of a 29-year old female who presented with a mass in the right breast is decribed.Immunohistochemical and cytological analysis revealed a GCT and subsequently wide local excision was performed.Further studies are required to explore the association between granular cell tumors and hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ningbo Medical Treatment Center, Lihuili Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315000, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Granular cell tumor of the breast (GCTB) is a rare tumor, particularly in lactating women. This tumor can clinically and radiologically mimic breast carcinoma, which poses particular problems. The association between GCTB and sex hormones should receive particular attention. The present study reports a case of GCTB in a lactating patient. In this tsudy, the case of a 29-year old female who presented with a mass in the right breast is decribed. Immunohistochemical and cytological analysis revealed a GCT and subsequently wide local excision was performed. At 15 months following surgery, the patient is well and no tumor recurrence has been identified. A comprehensive review of the literature was also performed to assess and compare all cases of GCTB, with particular attention to hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states. Further studies are required to explore the association between granular cell tumors and hyperestrogenic and hyperprolactinemic states.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus