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Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Jebel Moya: the relative density of burials with grave goods to burials without grave goods is greater in the southwest and north (>0.5) than in the east and northeast.
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Figure 8: Jebel Moya: the relative density of burials with grave goods to burials without grave goods is greater in the southwest and north (>0.5) than in the east and northeast.

Mentions: The majority of the extant sherds come from Assemblage 3, which has now been OSL-dated from the first century BC until the mid-first millennium AD. This timespan covers the middle and late Meroitic periods, as well as the aftermath of the breakup of the Meroitic state, which had stretched south into the Butana and with possible settlements along the Blue and White Niles. It is to this phase that the majority of the burials at Jebel Moya may now be assigned, effectively to a society living on the southwestern frontier of the Meroitic kingdom. Of the 3135 human burials, 1108 (35.3%) have associated grave goods, leaving 2026 burials (64.7%) without goods or with artefacts listed as coming from the grave infill. Contrary to the view expressed by Gerharz (1994), GIS analysis reveals that the distribution of grave goods is not concentrated in the east and northeast of the valley (Figure 8). This includes both imported items and items made from imported materials as accompanying burial goods. None of the grave goods (imports) are diagnostic of any temporal period earlier than the late first millennium BC and the only ceramics definitely associated with graves come from Assemblage 3 (see above). This revises the chronological reconstruction of Gerharz (1994: 331), who admitted that his notional end date for the site's sequence of the first century BC was guesswork: the absence of Meroitic pottery from Jebel Moya, and likewise the lack of Jebel Moya Assemblage 3 pottery at Shendi Reach, are not by themselves reliable chronological indicators when the new OSL dates are considered.


Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Jebel Moya: the relative density of burials with grave goods to burials without grave goods is greater in the southwest and north (>0.5) than in the east and northeast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214402&req=5

Figure 8: Jebel Moya: the relative density of burials with grave goods to burials without grave goods is greater in the southwest and north (>0.5) than in the east and northeast.
Mentions: The majority of the extant sherds come from Assemblage 3, which has now been OSL-dated from the first century BC until the mid-first millennium AD. This timespan covers the middle and late Meroitic periods, as well as the aftermath of the breakup of the Meroitic state, which had stretched south into the Butana and with possible settlements along the Blue and White Niles. It is to this phase that the majority of the burials at Jebel Moya may now be assigned, effectively to a society living on the southwestern frontier of the Meroitic kingdom. Of the 3135 human burials, 1108 (35.3%) have associated grave goods, leaving 2026 burials (64.7%) without goods or with artefacts listed as coming from the grave infill. Contrary to the view expressed by Gerharz (1994), GIS analysis reveals that the distribution of grave goods is not concentrated in the east and northeast of the valley (Figure 8). This includes both imported items and items made from imported materials as accompanying burial goods. None of the grave goods (imports) are diagnostic of any temporal period earlier than the late first millennium BC and the only ceramics definitely associated with graves come from Assemblage 3 (see above). This revises the chronological reconstruction of Gerharz (1994: 331), who admitted that his notional end date for the site's sequence of the first century BC was guesswork: the absence of Meroitic pottery from Jebel Moya, and likewise the lack of Jebel Moya Assemblage 3 pottery at Shendi Reach, are not by themselves reliable chronological indicators when the new OSL dates are considered.

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.