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Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Jebel Moya: the spatial distribution of pottery (red) in recorded association with human burials (grey).
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Figure 6: Jebel Moya: the spatial distribution of pottery (red) in recorded association with human burials (grey).

Mentions: In the new Register of Graves, 77 instances of pottery are recorded in direct association with human burials distributed across the valley (Figure 6, Table 1). Of these 77 burials, 24 (also distributed across the site and through the strata) contain pottery sherds that were illustrated either on the excavation cards or in Addison's publication, or both. Of the 24 illustrated pottery sherds and vessels found in association with burials, only one (Burial 1290) has an Assemblage 2 sherd under its left hand that could have been intrusive. The remainder all belong to Assemblage 3. Furthermore, none of the descriptions of non-illustrated burial assemblage pottery resemble any of the pottery assigned to Assemblage 2; instead, they are all attributable to Assemblage 3.


Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Jebel Moya: the spatial distribution of pottery (red) in recorded association with human burials (grey).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214402&req=5

Figure 6: Jebel Moya: the spatial distribution of pottery (red) in recorded association with human burials (grey).
Mentions: In the new Register of Graves, 77 instances of pottery are recorded in direct association with human burials distributed across the valley (Figure 6, Table 1). Of these 77 burials, 24 (also distributed across the site and through the strata) contain pottery sherds that were illustrated either on the excavation cards or in Addison's publication, or both. Of the 24 illustrated pottery sherds and vessels found in association with burials, only one (Burial 1290) has an Assemblage 2 sherd under its left hand that could have been intrusive. The remainder all belong to Assemblage 3. Furthermore, none of the descriptions of non-illustrated burial assemblage pottery resemble any of the pottery assigned to Assemblage 2; instead, they are all attributable to Assemblage 3.

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.