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Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Jebel Moya: Assemblage 3: (a) body sherd 2.5–4.5 mm thick with comb-stamped angular lines forming quadrangles; (b) simple rim and body sherd 3–6 mm thick with two comb-stamped channels under the lip and comb-stamped triangles on the body; (c) body sherd 1–4.5 mm thick with stylus-stamped wavy-lines, stylus-stamped chevron lines and comb-stamped triangular and vertical wavy-lines. The temper of all the sherds is sand with mica (with some organics) (All from Tray 2. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 3 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CI).
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Figure 5: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 3: (a) body sherd 2.5–4.5 mm thick with comb-stamped angular lines forming quadrangles; (b) simple rim and body sherd 3–6 mm thick with two comb-stamped channels under the lip and comb-stamped triangles on the body; (c) body sherd 1–4.5 mm thick with stylus-stamped wavy-lines, stylus-stamped chevron lines and comb-stamped triangular and vertical wavy-lines. The temper of all the sherds is sand with mica (with some organics) (All from Tray 2. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 3 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CI).

Mentions: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 2: (a) thick, rolled everted rim and body sherd 5–10 mm thick with dragged comb chevrons on the rim and a comb-stamped line under the lip; (b) thick, rolled everted rim and body sherd 3–24 mm thick with dragged comb chevrons on the lip and a wad of cord impression just under the lip; (c) thick, simple rim and body sherd 8–26 mm thick with incised angular lines on the lip and rows of vertical incised fillets just under it. The temper of all the sherds is coarse grit. (All from Tray 4. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 2 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CIV).


Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Jebel Moya: Assemblage 3: (a) body sherd 2.5–4.5 mm thick with comb-stamped angular lines forming quadrangles; (b) simple rim and body sherd 3–6 mm thick with two comb-stamped channels under the lip and comb-stamped triangles on the body; (c) body sherd 1–4.5 mm thick with stylus-stamped wavy-lines, stylus-stamped chevron lines and comb-stamped triangular and vertical wavy-lines. The temper of all the sherds is sand with mica (with some organics) (All from Tray 2. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 3 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CI).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214402&req=5

Figure 5: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 3: (a) body sherd 2.5–4.5 mm thick with comb-stamped angular lines forming quadrangles; (b) simple rim and body sherd 3–6 mm thick with two comb-stamped channels under the lip and comb-stamped triangles on the body; (c) body sherd 1–4.5 mm thick with stylus-stamped wavy-lines, stylus-stamped chevron lines and comb-stamped triangular and vertical wavy-lines. The temper of all the sherds is sand with mica (with some organics) (All from Tray 2. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 3 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CI).
Mentions: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 2: (a) thick, rolled everted rim and body sherd 5–10 mm thick with dragged comb chevrons on the rim and a comb-stamped line under the lip; (b) thick, rolled everted rim and body sherd 3–24 mm thick with dragged comb chevrons on the lip and a wad of cord impression just under the lip; (c) thick, simple rim and body sherd 8–26 mm thick with incised angular lines on the lip and rows of vertical incised fillets just under it. The temper of all the sherds is coarse grit. (All from Tray 4. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of large Assemblage 2 rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate CIV).

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus