Limits...
Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Jebel Moya: Assemblage 1: (a) body sherd 2–3 mm thick with comb-stamped decoration; (b) rim and body sherd 3 mm thick with comb-stamped and pivoted comb décor; (c) body sherd 5–6 mm thick with dragged comb lines and stamped comb décor. The temper of all the sherds is sand paste with bone mica (All from Tray 3. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of Assemblage 1 body and rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate XCIV).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214402&req=5

Figure 3: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 1: (a) body sherd 2–3 mm thick with comb-stamped decoration; (b) rim and body sherd 3 mm thick with comb-stamped and pivoted comb décor; (c) body sherd 5–6 mm thick with dragged comb lines and stamped comb décor. The temper of all the sherds is sand paste with bone mica (All from Tray 3. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of Assemblage 1 body and rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate XCIV).

Mentions: An attribute-based approach breaks down a vessel into its constituent components which can then be compared intra- and inter-site for coherence (Haour et al. 2010). Aims have included quantitatively assessing attributes to provide a better view of evolutionary changes, including those marking distinctive disjunctures, thereby providing a better understanding as to which attributes are culturally and temporally sensitive markers (Garcea and Hildebrand 2009). These attributes allow for subsequent sorting to identify trends and generate relevant typologies through the statistical recognition of attribute clusters. Three assemblages have been grouped from the remaining Jebel Moya pottery assemblage at the British Museum, totalling 486 (mostly) rim sherds attributed to different strata at the site. The sherds curated at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and at the Petrie Museum, fall within the variability of the three designated assemblages.


Jebel Moya (Sudan): new dates from a mortuary complex at the southern Meroitic frontier.

Brass M, Schwenniger JL - Azania (2013)

Jebel Moya: Assemblage 1: (a) body sherd 2–3 mm thick with comb-stamped decoration; (b) rim and body sherd 3 mm thick with comb-stamped and pivoted comb décor; (c) body sherd 5–6 mm thick with dragged comb lines and stamped comb décor. The temper of all the sherds is sand paste with bone mica (All from Tray 3. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of Assemblage 1 body and rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate XCIV).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214402&req=5

Figure 3: Jebel Moya: Assemblage 1: (a) body sherd 2–3 mm thick with comb-stamped decoration; (b) rim and body sherd 3 mm thick with comb-stamped and pivoted comb décor; (c) body sherd 5–6 mm thick with dragged comb lines and stamped comb décor. The temper of all the sherds is sand paste with bone mica (All from Tray 3. Reproduced with kind permission of the Trustees of the British Museum); (d) a selection of Assemblage 1 body and rim sherds (from Addison 1949: Plate XCIV).
Mentions: An attribute-based approach breaks down a vessel into its constituent components which can then be compared intra- and inter-site for coherence (Haour et al. 2010). Aims have included quantitatively assessing attributes to provide a better view of evolutionary changes, including those marking distinctive disjunctures, thereby providing a better understanding as to which attributes are culturally and temporally sensitive markers (Garcea and Hildebrand 2009). These attributes allow for subsequent sorting to identify trends and generate relevant typologies through the statistical recognition of attribute clusters. Three assemblages have been grouped from the remaining Jebel Moya pottery assemblage at the British Museum, totalling 486 (mostly) rim sherds attributed to different strata at the site. The sherds curated at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, and at the Petrie Museum, fall within the variability of the three designated assemblages.

Bottom Line: This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan.Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Archaeology, University College London, 31-34 Gordon Square, London, WC1H 0PY, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This paper proposes a new chronology for the burial complex at Jebel Moya, south-central Sudan. It reassesses the body of evidence from Sir Henry Wellcome's original 1911-1914 excavations in order to place the site within a firm chronological framework by: (a) applying an attribute-based approach to discern discrete pottery assemblages; and (b) applying initial OSL dates to facilitate the reliable dating of this site for the first time. Jebel Moya is re-interpreted as a burial complex situated on the southern periphery of the late Meroitic state, and its potential to serve as a chronological and cultural reference point for future studies in south-central and southern Sudan is outlined.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus