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Laparoscopic tumorectomy for a primary ovarian leiomyoma during pregnancy: A case report.

Zhao X, Chen L, Zeng W, Jin B, DU W - Oncol Lett (2014)

Bottom Line: A laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy was performed without complications.Therefore, laparoscopy may be considered as a minimally invasive and feasible alternative to laparotomy for the treatment of large ovarian solid tumors during pregnancy, resulting in reduced postoperative pain, a smaller scar and shorter recovery time.By contrast, with respect to the ovarian solid tumor, surgery prior to gestation is advised, even for tumors of <3 cm in diameter, due to the probability of rapid growth of the tumor during pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gynecology, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310014, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Few reports have explored laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy as a treatment for large and symptomatic ovarian leiomyomas during pregnancy. The current study presents the case of a patient with a large and symptomatic ovarian leiomyoma at 14 weeks of pregnancy. A laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy was performed without complications. The laparoscopic management of large primary ovarian leiomyoma during pregnancy has not been reported in literature. Therefore, laparoscopy may be considered as a minimally invasive and feasible alternative to laparotomy for the treatment of large ovarian solid tumors during pregnancy, resulting in reduced postoperative pain, a smaller scar and shorter recovery time. By contrast, with respect to the ovarian solid tumor, surgery prior to gestation is advised, even for tumors of <3 cm in diameter, due to the probability of rapid growth of the tumor during pregnancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

B-mode ultrasound showing (A) the fetus and (B) a right, hypoechoic adnexal mass.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214398&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2523: B-mode ultrasound showing (A) the fetus and (B) a right, hypoechoic adnexal mass.

Mentions: Ultrasound revealed a single live fetus and a partial cystic adnexal mass of 10.4×10×6.6 cm in size (Fig. 1).


Laparoscopic tumorectomy for a primary ovarian leiomyoma during pregnancy: A case report.

Zhao X, Chen L, Zeng W, Jin B, DU W - Oncol Lett (2014)

B-mode ultrasound showing (A) the fetus and (B) a right, hypoechoic adnexal mass.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214398&req=5

f1-ol-08-06-2523: B-mode ultrasound showing (A) the fetus and (B) a right, hypoechoic adnexal mass.
Mentions: Ultrasound revealed a single live fetus and a partial cystic adnexal mass of 10.4×10×6.6 cm in size (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: A laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy was performed without complications.Therefore, laparoscopy may be considered as a minimally invasive and feasible alternative to laparotomy for the treatment of large ovarian solid tumors during pregnancy, resulting in reduced postoperative pain, a smaller scar and shorter recovery time.By contrast, with respect to the ovarian solid tumor, surgery prior to gestation is advised, even for tumors of <3 cm in diameter, due to the probability of rapid growth of the tumor during pregnancy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gynecology, Zhejiang Provincial People's Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310014, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Few reports have explored laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy as a treatment for large and symptomatic ovarian leiomyomas during pregnancy. The current study presents the case of a patient with a large and symptomatic ovarian leiomyoma at 14 weeks of pregnancy. A laparoscopic adnexal tumorectomy was performed without complications. The laparoscopic management of large primary ovarian leiomyoma during pregnancy has not been reported in literature. Therefore, laparoscopy may be considered as a minimally invasive and feasible alternative to laparotomy for the treatment of large ovarian solid tumors during pregnancy, resulting in reduced postoperative pain, a smaller scar and shorter recovery time. By contrast, with respect to the ovarian solid tumor, surgery prior to gestation is advised, even for tumors of <3 cm in diameter, due to the probability of rapid growth of the tumor during pregnancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus