Limits...
Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile.

Chowell G, Simonsen L, Flores J, Miller MA, Viboud C - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2014)

Bottom Line: We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918-1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July-August 1919.Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults.Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918-1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July-August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94% in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal evolution (March 1918–December 1921) of all-cause mortality rates during the 1918 influenza pandemic across 24 provinces of Chile, sorted in geographic order from northern to southern Chile. For visualization purposes, the time series are log transformed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214284&req=5

Figure 2: Temporal evolution (March 1918–December 1921) of all-cause mortality rates during the 1918 influenza pandemic across 24 provinces of Chile, sorted in geographic order from northern to southern Chile. For visualization purposes, the time series are log transformed.

Mentions: According to province-level all-cause monthly mortality rates, the pandemic virus spread heterogeneously in multiple waves across Chile (Figure 2). The first pandemic wave spanned from October 1918 through February 1919, peaked in January 1919, and was relatively mild. The mean excess mortality rate was 13.6 deaths per 10,000 population across provinces. Latitude and population size explained 33% of the variability in the timing of peak pandemic activity from northern to southern Chile; deaths peaked earlier in the northern provinces (p = 0.02) (Figure 2).


Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile.

Chowell G, Simonsen L, Flores J, Miller MA, Viboud C - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2014)

Temporal evolution (March 1918–December 1921) of all-cause mortality rates during the 1918 influenza pandemic across 24 provinces of Chile, sorted in geographic order from northern to southern Chile. For visualization purposes, the time series are log transformed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4214284&req=5

Figure 2: Temporal evolution (March 1918–December 1921) of all-cause mortality rates during the 1918 influenza pandemic across 24 provinces of Chile, sorted in geographic order from northern to southern Chile. For visualization purposes, the time series are log transformed.
Mentions: According to province-level all-cause monthly mortality rates, the pandemic virus spread heterogeneously in multiple waves across Chile (Figure 2). The first pandemic wave spanned from October 1918 through February 1919, peaked in January 1919, and was relatively mild. The mean excess mortality rate was 13.6 deaths per 10,000 population across provinces. Latitude and population size explained 33% of the variability in the timing of peak pandemic activity from northern to southern Chile; deaths peaked earlier in the northern provinces (p = 0.02) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918-1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July-August 1919.Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults.Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918-1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July-August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94% in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus