Limits...
High rate of sexual dysfunction following surgery for rectal cancer.

Attaallah W, Ertekin C, Tinay I, Yegen C - Ann Coloproctol (2014)

Bottom Line: Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD.Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients.More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified.

Methods: Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes.

Results: Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction.

Conclusion: Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart for inclusion in the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4213936&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart for inclusion in the study.

Mentions: Between January 2012 and September 2013, 157 patients were operated on for rectal cancer in the General Surgery Clinic at Marmara University School of Medicine, Pendik Training & Research Hospital. A transanal excision was done for 2 patients, and a radical resection was performed for 155 patients (abdominoperineal resection for 37 patients, and low anterior resection for 120 patients). Patients who underwent a transanal excision were excluded. We had access to 125 patients who underwent a radical resection with abdominal surgery. Of the 125 patients, 114 were alive, and 11 had died. Thirty patients did not accept participating in the study. Five of those 30 patients did not accept participating in the study because they were not able to come to the hospital. The other 25 patients were not sexually active and, accordingly, did not accept the study. The remaining 84 patients who accepted the study and signed the informed consent forms were invited to the hospital so that evaluate their sexual functions could be evaluation (Fig. 1). All patients' median age was 60 years (28-91 years), and all of them were diagnosed with an adenocarcinoma. The demographic and the clinical characteristics of the patients are shown in Table 1.


High rate of sexual dysfunction following surgery for rectal cancer.

Attaallah W, Ertekin C, Tinay I, Yegen C - Ann Coloproctol (2014)

Flowchart for inclusion in the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4213936&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart for inclusion in the study.
Mentions: Between January 2012 and September 2013, 157 patients were operated on for rectal cancer in the General Surgery Clinic at Marmara University School of Medicine, Pendik Training & Research Hospital. A transanal excision was done for 2 patients, and a radical resection was performed for 155 patients (abdominoperineal resection for 37 patients, and low anterior resection for 120 patients). Patients who underwent a transanal excision were excluded. We had access to 125 patients who underwent a radical resection with abdominal surgery. Of the 125 patients, 114 were alive, and 11 had died. Thirty patients did not accept participating in the study. Five of those 30 patients did not accept participating in the study because they were not able to come to the hospital. The other 25 patients were not sexually active and, accordingly, did not accept the study. The remaining 84 patients who accepted the study and signed the informed consent forms were invited to the hospital so that evaluate their sexual functions could be evaluation (Fig. 1). All patients' median age was 60 years (28-91 years), and all of them were diagnosed with an adenocarcinoma. The demographic and the clinical characteristics of the patients are shown in Table 1.

Bottom Line: Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD.Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients.More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified.

Methods: Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes.

Results: Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction.

Conclusion: Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus