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Effect of resin infiltration on the nanomechanical properties of demineralized bovine enamel.

Tostes MA, Santos E, Camargo SA - Indian J Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: Hardness data were statistically analyzed by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and MannWhitney tests (α = 0.05).The findings showed statistical difference between treatments at the same analyzed distance range from the outer surface of the enamel (P < 0.05).The untreated lesion showed lower hardness values for distances near the outer surface of the enamel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of resin infiltration in preventing in vitro lesion progression.

Materials and methods: Buccal surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into mesial and distal regions and, at the center, nail varnish was applied (1.0 mm width) to protect the enamel surface against any further treatment. In order to create artificial enamel lesions in the unprotected areas, each specimen was soaked in a demineralizing solution. After that, specimens had two enamel lesions. One lesion in each sample was etched with 15% HCl for 120 s and infiltrated with a commercial infiltrating resin for 3 min, while the other lesion was not treated (control). Each specimen was cross-sectionally halved and randomly allocated to two groups: Group 1 was immediately processed and Group 2 was submitted to a new demineralization process. The samples were analyzed by means of cross-sectional hardness measurements using a nanoindenter equipment. Hardness data were statistically analyzed by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and MannWhitney tests (α = 0.05).

Results: The findings showed statistical difference between treatments at the same analyzed distance range from the outer surface of the enamel (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The untreated lesion showed lower hardness values for distances near the outer surface of the enamel. The resin infiltration was efficient in preventing further in vitro demineralization of bovine enamel lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematics of the sample preparation steps
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Figure 1: Schematics of the sample preparation steps

Mentions: Bovine teeth kept in 1% formaldehyde aqueous solution were employed in this study. The tooth crown cut at the cementoenamel junction was used as a specimen. After embedding in acrylic resin, the buccal surfaces were abraded with 400-grid to 1200-grid silicon carbide abrasive papers (Struers S/A, Struer, Denmark) in order to obtain flat enamel surfaces. Three specimens were chosen with a minimum surface area of 4.0 x 4.0 x 3.0 mm. The buccal surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into mesial and distal regions (according to Iijima et al.[8] ). Two consecutive layers of acid-resistant nail varnish were applied at the center region of about 1.0 mm width [Figure 1]. The artificial lesions were created through immersion of the samples into an acidified gel (0.1 N lactic acid containing 500.0 mg/L hydroxyapatite and pH 4.6)[14] at 37°C for 72 h [Figure 1]. After the demineralization process, the samples were immediately thoroughly rinsed with distilled water for 1 min. In this way, the specimens presented two enamel lesions. One of them was etched with 15% HCl for 120 s (Icon-Etch - DMG, Hamburg, Germany), rinsed with distilled water for 30 s and dried in air. Icon-dry was also applied for 30 s (air dried) and infiltrated with Icon® resin (DMG, Hamburg, Germany) for 3 min. Finally, samples were light-cured at 400 mW/cm2 (Optilux model VCL 400 curing light Kerr Inc., Danbury, CT, USA) for 40 s. The other lesion was not infiltrated (untreated control).


Effect of resin infiltration on the nanomechanical properties of demineralized bovine enamel.

Tostes MA, Santos E, Camargo SA - Indian J Dent (2014)

Schematics of the sample preparation steps
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4213871&req=5

Figure 1: Schematics of the sample preparation steps
Mentions: Bovine teeth kept in 1% formaldehyde aqueous solution were employed in this study. The tooth crown cut at the cementoenamel junction was used as a specimen. After embedding in acrylic resin, the buccal surfaces were abraded with 400-grid to 1200-grid silicon carbide abrasive papers (Struers S/A, Struer, Denmark) in order to obtain flat enamel surfaces. Three specimens were chosen with a minimum surface area of 4.0 x 4.0 x 3.0 mm. The buccal surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into mesial and distal regions (according to Iijima et al.[8] ). Two consecutive layers of acid-resistant nail varnish were applied at the center region of about 1.0 mm width [Figure 1]. The artificial lesions were created through immersion of the samples into an acidified gel (0.1 N lactic acid containing 500.0 mg/L hydroxyapatite and pH 4.6)[14] at 37°C for 72 h [Figure 1]. After the demineralization process, the samples were immediately thoroughly rinsed with distilled water for 1 min. In this way, the specimens presented two enamel lesions. One of them was etched with 15% HCl for 120 s (Icon-Etch - DMG, Hamburg, Germany), rinsed with distilled water for 30 s and dried in air. Icon-dry was also applied for 30 s (air dried) and infiltrated with Icon® resin (DMG, Hamburg, Germany) for 3 min. Finally, samples were light-cured at 400 mW/cm2 (Optilux model VCL 400 curing light Kerr Inc., Danbury, CT, USA) for 40 s. The other lesion was not infiltrated (untreated control).

Bottom Line: Hardness data were statistically analyzed by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and MannWhitney tests (α = 0.05).The findings showed statistical difference between treatments at the same analyzed distance range from the outer surface of the enamel (P < 0.05).The untreated lesion showed lower hardness values for distances near the outer surface of the enamel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Fluminense Federal University, Niterói, RJ, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of resin infiltration in preventing in vitro lesion progression.

Materials and methods: Buccal surfaces of bovine incisors were divided into mesial and distal regions and, at the center, nail varnish was applied (1.0 mm width) to protect the enamel surface against any further treatment. In order to create artificial enamel lesions in the unprotected areas, each specimen was soaked in a demineralizing solution. After that, specimens had two enamel lesions. One lesion in each sample was etched with 15% HCl for 120 s and infiltrated with a commercial infiltrating resin for 3 min, while the other lesion was not treated (control). Each specimen was cross-sectionally halved and randomly allocated to two groups: Group 1 was immediately processed and Group 2 was submitted to a new demineralization process. The samples were analyzed by means of cross-sectional hardness measurements using a nanoindenter equipment. Hardness data were statistically analyzed by non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and MannWhitney tests (α = 0.05).

Results: The findings showed statistical difference between treatments at the same analyzed distance range from the outer surface of the enamel (P < 0.05).

Conclusion: The untreated lesion showed lower hardness values for distances near the outer surface of the enamel. The resin infiltration was efficient in preventing further in vitro demineralization of bovine enamel lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus