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Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1) suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs.

Pérez FJ, Ponce CA, Rojas DA, Iturra PA, Bustamante RI, Gallo M, Hananias K, Vargas SL - Results Immunol (2014)

Bottom Line: Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017).Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs.Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Microbiología y Micología, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 - a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion - have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028). Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017). Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

hCLCA1 expression positively correlates with Pneumocystis organism’s load (Spearman rs=0.34785; P=0.0171). Correlation graph of hCLCA1 protein expression levels compared with Pneumocystis burden as determined by qPCR. Linear regression was performed and the fitted line is showed on the graph. Broken lines represent 95% confidence intervals.
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f0010: hCLCA1 expression positively correlates with Pneumocystis organism’s load (Spearman rs=0.34785; P=0.0171). Correlation graph of hCLCA1 protein expression levels compared with Pneumocystis burden as determined by qPCR. Linear regression was performed and the fitted line is showed on the graph. Broken lines represent 95% confidence intervals.

Mentions: The contribution of Pneumocystis burden to the expression of hCLCA1, as analyzed by correlation protein expression graphics, detected a significant positive correlation between increasing levels of hCLCA1 and Pneumocystis burden suggesting induction by Pneumocystis (Spearman r=0.3479; P=0.0171) (Fig. 2). Common respiratory viruses were studied in Pneumocystis-positive and Pneumocystis-negative samples to assess their contribution to hCLCA1 expression levels. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was diagnosed in three and Adenovirus in one of the Pneumocystis-positive samples. No viruses were detected in the Pneumocystis-negative samples (Fig. 3). Protein expression levels of hCLCA1 were no different in virus-positive compared to virus-negative samples indicating that, in these samples, viruses do not explain the Pneumocystis-associated increased levels of this protein. Moreover, virus positive samples were grouped for this comparative analysis, and no significant difference in hCLCA1 expression was detected between virus-positive and virus-negative samples (P=0.7648) (Fig. 3).


Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1) suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs.

Pérez FJ, Ponce CA, Rojas DA, Iturra PA, Bustamante RI, Gallo M, Hananias K, Vargas SL - Results Immunol (2014)

hCLCA1 expression positively correlates with Pneumocystis organism’s load (Spearman rs=0.34785; P=0.0171). Correlation graph of hCLCA1 protein expression levels compared with Pneumocystis burden as determined by qPCR. Linear regression was performed and the fitted line is showed on the graph. Broken lines represent 95% confidence intervals.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4213842&req=5

f0010: hCLCA1 expression positively correlates with Pneumocystis organism’s load (Spearman rs=0.34785; P=0.0171). Correlation graph of hCLCA1 protein expression levels compared with Pneumocystis burden as determined by qPCR. Linear regression was performed and the fitted line is showed on the graph. Broken lines represent 95% confidence intervals.
Mentions: The contribution of Pneumocystis burden to the expression of hCLCA1, as analyzed by correlation protein expression graphics, detected a significant positive correlation between increasing levels of hCLCA1 and Pneumocystis burden suggesting induction by Pneumocystis (Spearman r=0.3479; P=0.0171) (Fig. 2). Common respiratory viruses were studied in Pneumocystis-positive and Pneumocystis-negative samples to assess their contribution to hCLCA1 expression levels. Respiratory Syncytial Virus was diagnosed in three and Adenovirus in one of the Pneumocystis-positive samples. No viruses were detected in the Pneumocystis-negative samples (Fig. 3). Protein expression levels of hCLCA1 were no different in virus-positive compared to virus-negative samples indicating that, in these samples, viruses do not explain the Pneumocystis-associated increased levels of this protein. Moreover, virus positive samples were grouped for this comparative analysis, and no significant difference in hCLCA1 expression was detected between virus-positive and virus-negative samples (P=0.7648) (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017).Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs.Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Microbiología y Micología, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina Universidad de Chile, Santiago 8380453, Chile.

ABSTRACT
Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 - a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion - have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028). Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017). Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus