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Si-doped ceramic Al4O4C nanowires: full-color emission and optical waveguide behavior.

Sun Y, Lei HX, Cui H, Yang GW, Li BJ, Wang CX - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: This development has resulted in the demand for micro-nano-sized functional units with specific space dimensions (1D &2D) for subwavelength photon operation purposes.High light propagation performance was also observed when blue, green and red lasers were coupled into a single nanowire using a tapered optical fiber.This novel 1D nanostructure is an excellent candidate for use in future photonic circuits as a white-light source or interconnection component.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State key laboratory of optoelectronic materials and technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, Guangzhou 510275, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The increasing prosperity of the photonics field has hastened the development of several sub-disciplines, with the aim to create advanced photonic devices, produce photonic circuits and eventually enable all-optical communication. This development has resulted in the demand for micro-nano-sized functional units with specific space dimensions (1D &2D) for subwavelength photon operation purposes. The fundamental task involves a search for available semiconductor materials as micro-nano light sources and optical interconnections; in this regard, finding a white-light source is the most challenging task because typical band-band emission is not possible in the single phase. Using current approaches, which rely on surface-state emission and the integration of various emission components, it is impossible to achieve single-phase, single-unit components with specific space dimensions. Here, we achieved continuous full-color (ultraviolet to red) emission by engineering a single Al4O4C nanowire with Si doping, which created impurity levels in the bandgap and conduction band. High light propagation performance was also observed when blue, green and red lasers were coupled into a single nanowire using a tapered optical fiber. This novel 1D nanostructure is an excellent candidate for use in future photonic circuits as a white-light source or interconnection component.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CL investigation of the samples.(a–c) Three sets of nanowires selected for application of the CL test. (d), (e) and (f) CL images corresponding to (a), (b) and (c). The scale bars are 2 µm.
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f4: CL investigation of the samples.(a–c) Three sets of nanowires selected for application of the CL test. (d), (e) and (f) CL images corresponding to (a), (b) and (c). The scale bars are 2 µm.

Mentions: To investigate the luminescence performance and the electronic structure, we applied cathode electrons to excite a single 1D nanostructure, utilizing its micro-domain analysis advantages. For units with different profiles, CL images were recorded, as shown in Fig. 4. Figs. 4(a) and (b) present SEM images of nanowires with different profiles, and Figs. 4(d) and (e) present corresponding CL images. Fig. 4(f) shows a CL image of several nanostructures stacked together, as displayed in Fig. 4(c), for which all of the nanostructures exhibit the same light emission behavior. Additionally, the emission spectra were recorded to confirm the consistency among different units. As expected, all of the spectra exhibit the same profile, as illustrated in Fig. 5(a). The cathode-electron irradiation clearly yields light emission from the ultraviolet to red region. After adjusting the spectrum to the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram, as shown in Fig. 5(b), the emission spectrum was determined to be in the CWF (cool white florence) region in the chromaticity diagram, with a CCT (correlated color temperature) of approximately 8000 K. The three vertices of the red triangle represent the coordinates of the pure green, red and blue light regions according to the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC). The red square at the coordinate of (0.33, 0.33) represents pure white light with a CCT of approximately 5600 K. The black triangle represents the coordinate of our spectrum, which is consistent with CWF in the industrial LED field. Fig. 5(c) presents the CL spectra of pure Al4O4C (red line) and the Si-doped phase (blue line), which display an obvious difference. Both of the emission spectra exhibit a similar peak corresponding to band-band transitions at 420 nm and 418 nm, respectively. There are two additional peaks in the Si-doped phase at 331 nm and 620 nm, which implies that the introduction of Si atoms results in several levels within the fundamental bandgap and even in the conduction band that are available for radiative transition. Based on the CL spectrum, we can use Fig. 5(d) to illustrate the possible transition process, as indicated by the colored dotted arrows.


Si-doped ceramic Al4O4C nanowires: full-color emission and optical waveguide behavior.

Sun Y, Lei HX, Cui H, Yang GW, Li BJ, Wang CX - Sci Rep (2014)

CL investigation of the samples.(a–c) Three sets of nanowires selected for application of the CL test. (d), (e) and (f) CL images corresponding to (a), (b) and (c). The scale bars are 2 µm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4213773&req=5

f4: CL investigation of the samples.(a–c) Three sets of nanowires selected for application of the CL test. (d), (e) and (f) CL images corresponding to (a), (b) and (c). The scale bars are 2 µm.
Mentions: To investigate the luminescence performance and the electronic structure, we applied cathode electrons to excite a single 1D nanostructure, utilizing its micro-domain analysis advantages. For units with different profiles, CL images were recorded, as shown in Fig. 4. Figs. 4(a) and (b) present SEM images of nanowires with different profiles, and Figs. 4(d) and (e) present corresponding CL images. Fig. 4(f) shows a CL image of several nanostructures stacked together, as displayed in Fig. 4(c), for which all of the nanostructures exhibit the same light emission behavior. Additionally, the emission spectra were recorded to confirm the consistency among different units. As expected, all of the spectra exhibit the same profile, as illustrated in Fig. 5(a). The cathode-electron irradiation clearly yields light emission from the ultraviolet to red region. After adjusting the spectrum to the CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram, as shown in Fig. 5(b), the emission spectrum was determined to be in the CWF (cool white florence) region in the chromaticity diagram, with a CCT (correlated color temperature) of approximately 8000 K. The three vertices of the red triangle represent the coordinates of the pure green, red and blue light regions according to the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC). The red square at the coordinate of (0.33, 0.33) represents pure white light with a CCT of approximately 5600 K. The black triangle represents the coordinate of our spectrum, which is consistent with CWF in the industrial LED field. Fig. 5(c) presents the CL spectra of pure Al4O4C (red line) and the Si-doped phase (blue line), which display an obvious difference. Both of the emission spectra exhibit a similar peak corresponding to band-band transitions at 420 nm and 418 nm, respectively. There are two additional peaks in the Si-doped phase at 331 nm and 620 nm, which implies that the introduction of Si atoms results in several levels within the fundamental bandgap and even in the conduction band that are available for radiative transition. Based on the CL spectrum, we can use Fig. 5(d) to illustrate the possible transition process, as indicated by the colored dotted arrows.

Bottom Line: This development has resulted in the demand for micro-nano-sized functional units with specific space dimensions (1D &2D) for subwavelength photon operation purposes.High light propagation performance was also observed when blue, green and red lasers were coupled into a single nanowire using a tapered optical fiber.This novel 1D nanostructure is an excellent candidate for use in future photonic circuits as a white-light source or interconnection component.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State key laboratory of optoelectronic materials and technologies, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen (Zhongshan) University, Guangzhou 510275, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The increasing prosperity of the photonics field has hastened the development of several sub-disciplines, with the aim to create advanced photonic devices, produce photonic circuits and eventually enable all-optical communication. This development has resulted in the demand for micro-nano-sized functional units with specific space dimensions (1D &2D) for subwavelength photon operation purposes. The fundamental task involves a search for available semiconductor materials as micro-nano light sources and optical interconnections; in this regard, finding a white-light source is the most challenging task because typical band-band emission is not possible in the single phase. Using current approaches, which rely on surface-state emission and the integration of various emission components, it is impossible to achieve single-phase, single-unit components with specific space dimensions. Here, we achieved continuous full-color (ultraviolet to red) emission by engineering a single Al4O4C nanowire with Si doping, which created impurity levels in the bandgap and conduction band. High light propagation performance was also observed when blue, green and red lasers were coupled into a single nanowire using a tapered optical fiber. This novel 1D nanostructure is an excellent candidate for use in future photonic circuits as a white-light source or interconnection component.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus