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Ovarian cancer screening practices of obstetricians and gynecologists in puerto rico.

Rodríguez-Ayala G, Romaguera J, López M, Ortiz AP - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: Response rate was 25%.Overall, 53.9% were screening for the disease.Reported screening methods were CA-125 and transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS), 39.2%, TVUS only, 30.4%, and CA-125 only, 9.8%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, PR 00936-5067, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ovarian cancer is the most fatal malignancy of the female genital tract and is associated with high mortality. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommend against screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic, average-risk women.

Objective: To assess the ovarian cancer screening practices in asymptomatic, average-risk women among obstetricians and gynecologists (Ob/Gyn) in Puerto Rico. Methodology. From 2011 to 2012, self-administered anonymous questionnaires were mailed to all licensed obstetricians and gynecologists in PR.

Results: Response rate was 25%. Overall, 53.9% were screening for the disease. Reported screening methods were CA-125 and transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS), 39.2%, TVUS only, 30.4%, and CA-125 only, 9.8%. In the logistic regression model, the odds that a given health practitioner routinely screened for ovarian cancer in the asymptomatic, average-risk population increased by 8% with every unit increase in his or her years in practice.

Conclusion: The majority of the practicing Ob/Gyn in PR who participated are not following the guidelines established by the ACOG and the USPSTF for ovarian cancer screening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution (%) of the resources used by the participating physicians to learn about current screening recommendations for ovarian cancer (n = 99).
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fig3: Distribution (%) of the resources used by the participating physicians to learn about current screening recommendations for ovarian cancer (n = 99).

Mentions: Approximately half of the physicians (53.9%) routinely screened their asymptomatic, average-risk patients for ovarian cancer despite their low risk for the disease and no genetic or family history (Figure 1). The distribution of modalities used as a first test to screen for ovarian cancer was as follows: (1) transvaginal ultrasound, 31.3%; (2) CA-125, 10.2%; and (3) both, 40.4%. Twenty-eight percent of the physicians did not perform any screening in the initial visit. The mean patient age at which physicians start screening was 41.7±9.2 years. Most of the physicians never stop (48.0%) screening for ovarian cancer. Fifty-nine of the physicians reported screening for ovarian cancer in average-risk women every year. Most of the physicians (79.4%) reported unproved effectiveness as a reason for not screening with either CA-125 or transvaginal ultrasound (Figure 2). Finally, the completed questionnaires included valuable information in terms of how physicians learned about current screening recommendations (n = 102). Most of the physicians reported professional organizations and medical journals as being their principal sources of knowledge for current screening recommendations (Figure 3).


Ovarian cancer screening practices of obstetricians and gynecologists in puerto rico.

Rodríguez-Ayala G, Romaguera J, López M, Ortiz AP - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Distribution (%) of the resources used by the participating physicians to learn about current screening recommendations for ovarian cancer (n = 99).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209753&req=5

fig3: Distribution (%) of the resources used by the participating physicians to learn about current screening recommendations for ovarian cancer (n = 99).
Mentions: Approximately half of the physicians (53.9%) routinely screened their asymptomatic, average-risk patients for ovarian cancer despite their low risk for the disease and no genetic or family history (Figure 1). The distribution of modalities used as a first test to screen for ovarian cancer was as follows: (1) transvaginal ultrasound, 31.3%; (2) CA-125, 10.2%; and (3) both, 40.4%. Twenty-eight percent of the physicians did not perform any screening in the initial visit. The mean patient age at which physicians start screening was 41.7±9.2 years. Most of the physicians never stop (48.0%) screening for ovarian cancer. Fifty-nine of the physicians reported screening for ovarian cancer in average-risk women every year. Most of the physicians (79.4%) reported unproved effectiveness as a reason for not screening with either CA-125 or transvaginal ultrasound (Figure 2). Finally, the completed questionnaires included valuable information in terms of how physicians learned about current screening recommendations (n = 102). Most of the physicians reported professional organizations and medical journals as being their principal sources of knowledge for current screening recommendations (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Response rate was 25%.Overall, 53.9% were screening for the disease.Reported screening methods were CA-125 and transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS), 39.2%, TVUS only, 30.4%, and CA-125 only, 9.8%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, San Juan, PR 00936-5067, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ovarian cancer is the most fatal malignancy of the female genital tract and is associated with high mortality. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommend against screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic, average-risk women.

Objective: To assess the ovarian cancer screening practices in asymptomatic, average-risk women among obstetricians and gynecologists (Ob/Gyn) in Puerto Rico. Methodology. From 2011 to 2012, self-administered anonymous questionnaires were mailed to all licensed obstetricians and gynecologists in PR.

Results: Response rate was 25%. Overall, 53.9% were screening for the disease. Reported screening methods were CA-125 and transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS), 39.2%, TVUS only, 30.4%, and CA-125 only, 9.8%. In the logistic regression model, the odds that a given health practitioner routinely screened for ovarian cancer in the asymptomatic, average-risk population increased by 8% with every unit increase in his or her years in practice.

Conclusion: The majority of the practicing Ob/Gyn in PR who participated are not following the guidelines established by the ACOG and the USPSTF for ovarian cancer screening.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus