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Modified Wilson's Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Deformity. A New Approach.

Xarchas KC, Mavrolias D, Kyriakopoulos G - Open Orthop J (2014)

Bottom Line: Patients were of an average age of 52 years old (from 21 to 75 years of age) and were followed up for a mean of 12 months post-operatively.Patient evaluation was made with the symptom scoring system as presented by Kataraglis et al., with the final outcome being satisfactory in all of the cases.This set of modifications introduced to the original Wilson's osteotomy, proved to offer a stable, predictable and satisfactory outcome in all cases and we strongly recommend it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1st Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, General Hospital G. Gennimatas, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
We introduce a new set of modifications and present the results from 48 patients (a total of 60 feet operated), who underwent this modified Wilson's osteotomy for the correction of Hallux Valgus. Patients were of an average age of 52 years old (from 21 to 75 years of age) and were followed up for a mean of 12 months post-operatively. Patient evaluation was made with the symptom scoring system as presented by Kataraglis et al., with the final outcome being satisfactory in all of the cases. This set of modifications introduced to the original Wilson's osteotomy, proved to offer a stable, predictable and satisfactory outcome in all cases and we strongly recommend it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a, b) Postoperative X-rays (Lat). Note that proximalfragment slightly covers distal, to prevent it from dorsaldisplacement.
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Figure 7: (a, b) Postoperative X-rays (Lat). Note that proximalfragment slightly covers distal, to prevent it from dorsaldisplacement.

Mentions: medially-distal to laterally-proximal, starting from the proximal end (base) of the exostectomy and additionally with a plantar inclination of 30º. It should be noted here that the osteotomy was performed with the use of a power saw, only. On the contrary, the exostectomy was always performed with the use of an osteotomy chisel (Figs. 4, 5). We consider that mishaps such as fracture of the metatarsal shaft or removal of excessive amount of bone from the metatarsal head can this way be avoided. The distal fragment was stabilized with the use of a K-wire inserted through the margin of the articular surface of the head of the metatarsal, with respect to the joint surface and advanced either intramedullarly in the shaft, or transfixing it. Next, trimming of the protruding bony edge of the proximal fragment with the use of a bone nibbler was performed and “Y-V” capsulorraphy with the use of interrupted absorbable sutures. Skin suturing and bandaging. The foot was kept elevated for 48 hours, after which heel weight-bearing was initiated. Skin sutures where removed after the second post-operative week and the K-wires were removed at approximately four weeks after surgery. Full weight bearing was routinely allowed on the sixth postoperative week. The patients were followed up both radiologically and clinically at six weeks (Figs. 6, 7), three months, six months and one year.


Modified Wilson's Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Deformity. A New Approach.

Xarchas KC, Mavrolias D, Kyriakopoulos G - Open Orthop J (2014)

(a, b) Postoperative X-rays (Lat). Note that proximalfragment slightly covers distal, to prevent it from dorsaldisplacement.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209519&req=5

Figure 7: (a, b) Postoperative X-rays (Lat). Note that proximalfragment slightly covers distal, to prevent it from dorsaldisplacement.
Mentions: medially-distal to laterally-proximal, starting from the proximal end (base) of the exostectomy and additionally with a plantar inclination of 30º. It should be noted here that the osteotomy was performed with the use of a power saw, only. On the contrary, the exostectomy was always performed with the use of an osteotomy chisel (Figs. 4, 5). We consider that mishaps such as fracture of the metatarsal shaft or removal of excessive amount of bone from the metatarsal head can this way be avoided. The distal fragment was stabilized with the use of a K-wire inserted through the margin of the articular surface of the head of the metatarsal, with respect to the joint surface and advanced either intramedullarly in the shaft, or transfixing it. Next, trimming of the protruding bony edge of the proximal fragment with the use of a bone nibbler was performed and “Y-V” capsulorraphy with the use of interrupted absorbable sutures. Skin suturing and bandaging. The foot was kept elevated for 48 hours, after which heel weight-bearing was initiated. Skin sutures where removed after the second post-operative week and the K-wires were removed at approximately four weeks after surgery. Full weight bearing was routinely allowed on the sixth postoperative week. The patients were followed up both radiologically and clinically at six weeks (Figs. 6, 7), three months, six months and one year.

Bottom Line: Patients were of an average age of 52 years old (from 21 to 75 years of age) and were followed up for a mean of 12 months post-operatively.Patient evaluation was made with the symptom scoring system as presented by Kataraglis et al., with the final outcome being satisfactory in all of the cases.This set of modifications introduced to the original Wilson's osteotomy, proved to offer a stable, predictable and satisfactory outcome in all cases and we strongly recommend it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1st Department of Orthopedics and Trauma, General Hospital G. Gennimatas, Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT
We introduce a new set of modifications and present the results from 48 patients (a total of 60 feet operated), who underwent this modified Wilson's osteotomy for the correction of Hallux Valgus. Patients were of an average age of 52 years old (from 21 to 75 years of age) and were followed up for a mean of 12 months post-operatively. Patient evaluation was made with the symptom scoring system as presented by Kataraglis et al., with the final outcome being satisfactory in all of the cases. This set of modifications introduced to the original Wilson's osteotomy, proved to offer a stable, predictable and satisfactory outcome in all cases and we strongly recommend it.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus