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Cervical spine computed tomography imaging artifact affecting clinical decision-making in the traumatized patient.

Coats AC, Nies MS, Rispler D - Open Orthop J (2014)

Bottom Line: On the basis of CT findings, the patient was transferred to a different hospital for evaluation.Discrepancy between the primary CT scan and patient physical exam prompted secondary CT scans and X-ray evaluation; neither of these studies showed osseous abnormalities.This case reinforces the necessity for physicians to formulate their diagnosis based upon multiple areas of information including physical examination, plain x-ray and subsequent advanced imaging, rather than relying solely on advanced imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: American Health Network, Indy Bone and Spine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

ABSTRACT
CT scanning is an important tool in the evaluation of trauma patients. We review a case involving a trauma patient in which a cervical spine computed tomography (CT) artifact affected decision-making by physicians. The CT artifact mimicked bilateral dislocated facets (51-B1.1). On the basis of CT findings, the patient was transferred to a different hospital for evaluation. Discrepancy between the primary CT scan and patient physical exam prompted secondary CT scans and X-ray evaluation; neither of these studies showed osseous abnormalities. This case reinforces the necessity for physicians to formulate their diagnosis based upon multiple areas of information including physical examination, plain x-ray and subsequent advanced imaging, rather than relying solely on advanced imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Saggital cut of initial cervical spine CT scan.
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Figure 1: Saggital cut of initial cervical spine CT scan.

Mentions: After further review of the original CT scan images, an aberration was noted on the axial image. On closer inspection, the sagittal image also appeared aberrant (Figs. 1, 2). Thus, a repeat c-spine CT (Figs. 3, 4) was ordered. These images showed no osseous abnormalities, consistent with the physical examination. A lateral c-spine x-ray (Fig. 5) confirmed this finding. Per protocol for cervical sprain, the patient was placed in a Miami-J cervical collar and discharged with follow-up.


Cervical spine computed tomography imaging artifact affecting clinical decision-making in the traumatized patient.

Coats AC, Nies MS, Rispler D - Open Orthop J (2014)

Saggital cut of initial cervical spine CT scan.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209502&req=5

Figure 1: Saggital cut of initial cervical spine CT scan.
Mentions: After further review of the original CT scan images, an aberration was noted on the axial image. On closer inspection, the sagittal image also appeared aberrant (Figs. 1, 2). Thus, a repeat c-spine CT (Figs. 3, 4) was ordered. These images showed no osseous abnormalities, consistent with the physical examination. A lateral c-spine x-ray (Fig. 5) confirmed this finding. Per protocol for cervical sprain, the patient was placed in a Miami-J cervical collar and discharged with follow-up.

Bottom Line: On the basis of CT findings, the patient was transferred to a different hospital for evaluation.Discrepancy between the primary CT scan and patient physical exam prompted secondary CT scans and X-ray evaluation; neither of these studies showed osseous abnormalities.This case reinforces the necessity for physicians to formulate their diagnosis based upon multiple areas of information including physical examination, plain x-ray and subsequent advanced imaging, rather than relying solely on advanced imaging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: American Health Network, Indy Bone and Spine, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

ABSTRACT
CT scanning is an important tool in the evaluation of trauma patients. We review a case involving a trauma patient in which a cervical spine computed tomography (CT) artifact affected decision-making by physicians. The CT artifact mimicked bilateral dislocated facets (51-B1.1). On the basis of CT findings, the patient was transferred to a different hospital for evaluation. Discrepancy between the primary CT scan and patient physical exam prompted secondary CT scans and X-ray evaluation; neither of these studies showed osseous abnormalities. This case reinforces the necessity for physicians to formulate their diagnosis based upon multiple areas of information including physical examination, plain x-ray and subsequent advanced imaging, rather than relying solely on advanced imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus