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Relationship between Health-Seeking Behavior by Basic Health Examination and Subsequent Health Expenditure among Remote Island Inhabitants of Japan.

Kinjo A, Myoga Y, Osaki Y - Yonago Acta Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison.Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004).Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago 683-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Convincing evidence has not been obtained as to whether having a basic health examination in the prime of life inhibits the surge of health expenditure in old age.

Data sources: Data on participants in the basic health examination from 1996 to 2000 among residents of a remote island in Japan, and individual health care expenditure data from March 2005 to February 2008.

Study design: A community-based retrospective study.

Data collection: Japanese residents who were subscribers to the National Health Insurance Scheme of Chibu Town from March 1996 to March 2007 and were aged 40 to 64 years in March 1996 (n = 179) were divided into 3 groups depending on the frequency of participating in the basic health examination over 5 years: 0 times (nontakers), 1 to 3 times (occasional takers), or 4 to 5 times (regular takers). The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison.

Results: Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004).

Conclusion: Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

No MeSH data available.


Total health expenditure for 3 years per capita according to the frequency of having a basichealth examination.
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fig_002: Total health expenditure for 3 years per capita according to the frequency of having a basichealth examination.

Mentions: Among men, the average total health care expenditure over 3 years was 1,022,658 yen for nontakers, 830,793 yenfor occasional takers and 848,254 yen for regular takers. Among women, the average total health care expenditureover 3 years was 1,164,339 yen for nontakers, 1,010,922 yen for occasional takers and 805,002 yen for regulartakers (Fig. 2).


Relationship between Health-Seeking Behavior by Basic Health Examination and Subsequent Health Expenditure among Remote Island Inhabitants of Japan.

Kinjo A, Myoga Y, Osaki Y - Yonago Acta Med (2014)

Total health expenditure for 3 years per capita according to the frequency of having a basichealth examination.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209340&req=5

fig_002: Total health expenditure for 3 years per capita according to the frequency of having a basichealth examination.
Mentions: Among men, the average total health care expenditure over 3 years was 1,022,658 yen for nontakers, 830,793 yenfor occasional takers and 848,254 yen for regular takers. Among women, the average total health care expenditureover 3 years was 1,164,339 yen for nontakers, 1,010,922 yen for occasional takers and 805,002 yen for regulartakers (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison.Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004).Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Environmental and Preventive Medicine, Department of Social Medicine, School of Medicine, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, Yonago 683-8503, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Convincing evidence has not been obtained as to whether having a basic health examination in the prime of life inhibits the surge of health expenditure in old age.

Data sources: Data on participants in the basic health examination from 1996 to 2000 among residents of a remote island in Japan, and individual health care expenditure data from March 2005 to February 2008.

Study design: A community-based retrospective study.

Data collection: Japanese residents who were subscribers to the National Health Insurance Scheme of Chibu Town from March 1996 to March 2007 and were aged 40 to 64 years in March 1996 (n = 179) were divided into 3 groups depending on the frequency of participating in the basic health examination over 5 years: 0 times (nontakers), 1 to 3 times (occasional takers), or 4 to 5 times (regular takers). The distribution of total health expenditure according to the frequency of having a basic health examination was determined, and the Cochrane-Armitage test was used for comparison.

Results: Nontakers formed the highest proportion of subjects with low expenditure (0-200,000 yen) (nontaker, occasional, regular: 38.5%, 24.1%, 23.5%; P = 0.002), and also accounted for the highest proportion of subjects with high expenditure (> 1,400,000 yen) (33.3%, 16.1%, 9.4%; P = 0.004).

Conclusion: Persons not participating in health examinations during middle age include a group with high future health care expenditure.

No MeSH data available.