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Successful Treatment of Two Cases of Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Ear with Intra-Arterial Administration of Peplomycin through a Superficial Temporal Artery.

Haga T, Fujimura T, Takeuchi I, Deguchi M, Aiba S - Case Rep Dermatol (2014)

Bottom Line: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and tends to develop in sun-exposed cosmetic areas, including the ear.In this report, we describe two cases of SCC on the ear successfully treated with intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery.These findings suggest that intra-arterial administration of peplomycin with tegafur is one of the optimal therapies for the treatment of SCC developing on the ear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and tends to develop in sun-exposed cosmetic areas, including the ear. In this report, we describe two cases of SCC on the ear successfully treated with intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery. In addition to this selective chemotherapy, we administered oral tegafur, which achieved complete remission of the tumor. These findings suggest that intra-arterial administration of peplomycin with tegafur is one of the optimal therapies for the treatment of SCC developing on the ear.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a, b Dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm. c, d No tumor cells remained 4 weeks after the intra-arterial administration of peplomycin. Original magnification ×100 (a, c) and ×400 (b, d).
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Figure 2: a, b Dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm. c, d No tumor cells remained 4 weeks after the intra-arterial administration of peplomycin. Original magnification ×100 (a, c) and ×400 (b, d).

Mentions: An 86-year-old Japanese man visited our outpatient clinic with a 4-month history of a red nodule on his ear. On his initial visit, physical examination revealed a red, dome-shaped, easy-to-bleed nodule with necrotic tissue on his right ear (fig. 1a). The size was approximately 100 × 70 mm in diameter. A biopsy specimen revealed dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm (fig. 2a, b). The serum SCC antigen level (SCC Ag) was within normal range. We screened for a possible internal malignancy with a CT scan but found none, except for slight swelling of a cervical lymph node. From the above findings, we diagnosed this patient as poorly differentiated SCC, and for functional and cosmetic reasons, we selected intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery using an intravascular indwelling catheter. We indwelled the point of the catheter at the feeding artery of the tumor by using indigo carmine (fig. 1b), and continuously administered 5 mg of peplomycin per day intra-arterially for 12 days. Four weeks after we finished the administration of peplomycin, the tumor mass had rapidly regressed, leaving a scar (fig. 1c). A biopsy specimen revealed that no tumor cells remained at this time point (fig. 2c, d). We added oral administration of 100 mg tegafur for 8 weeks, and there has been no sign of local recurrence or systemic lesions for 18 months.


Successful Treatment of Two Cases of Squamous Cell Carcinoma on the Ear with Intra-Arterial Administration of Peplomycin through a Superficial Temporal Artery.

Haga T, Fujimura T, Takeuchi I, Deguchi M, Aiba S - Case Rep Dermatol (2014)

a, b Dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm. c, d No tumor cells remained 4 weeks after the intra-arterial administration of peplomycin. Original magnification ×100 (a, c) and ×400 (b, d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209265&req=5

Figure 2: a, b Dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm. c, d No tumor cells remained 4 weeks after the intra-arterial administration of peplomycin. Original magnification ×100 (a, c) and ×400 (b, d).
Mentions: An 86-year-old Japanese man visited our outpatient clinic with a 4-month history of a red nodule on his ear. On his initial visit, physical examination revealed a red, dome-shaped, easy-to-bleed nodule with necrotic tissue on his right ear (fig. 1a). The size was approximately 100 × 70 mm in diameter. A biopsy specimen revealed dermal infiltration of the tumor, which was composed of atypical keratinocytes with dyskeratotic cytoplasm (fig. 2a, b). The serum SCC antigen level (SCC Ag) was within normal range. We screened for a possible internal malignancy with a CT scan but found none, except for slight swelling of a cervical lymph node. From the above findings, we diagnosed this patient as poorly differentiated SCC, and for functional and cosmetic reasons, we selected intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery using an intravascular indwelling catheter. We indwelled the point of the catheter at the feeding artery of the tumor by using indigo carmine (fig. 1b), and continuously administered 5 mg of peplomycin per day intra-arterially for 12 days. Four weeks after we finished the administration of peplomycin, the tumor mass had rapidly regressed, leaving a scar (fig. 1c). A biopsy specimen revealed that no tumor cells remained at this time point (fig. 2c, d). We added oral administration of 100 mg tegafur for 8 weeks, and there has been no sign of local recurrence or systemic lesions for 18 months.

Bottom Line: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and tends to develop in sun-exposed cosmetic areas, including the ear.In this report, we describe two cases of SCC on the ear successfully treated with intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery.These findings suggest that intra-arterial administration of peplomycin with tegafur is one of the optimal therapies for the treatment of SCC developing on the ear.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common non-melanoma skin cancer and tends to develop in sun-exposed cosmetic areas, including the ear. In this report, we describe two cases of SCC on the ear successfully treated with intra-arterial administration of peplomycin through a superficial temporal artery. In addition to this selective chemotherapy, we administered oral tegafur, which achieved complete remission of the tumor. These findings suggest that intra-arterial administration of peplomycin with tegafur is one of the optimal therapies for the treatment of SCC developing on the ear.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus