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Quantification of right ventricular volume in dogs: a comparative study between three-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography with the reference method magnetic resonance imaging.

Sieslack AK, Dziallas P, Nolte I, Wefstaedt P, Hungerbühler SO - BMC Vet. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was the comparison of 3DE and CCT with CMRI, the gold standard for RV volumetric quantification. 3DE showed significant lower and CCT significant higher right ventricular volumes than CMRI.Ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were not different when considering CCT and CMRI, whereas 3DE showed a significant higher EF and lower SV than CMRI.CCT provides an accurate image quality of the right ventricle with comparable results to the reference method CMRI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Right ventricular (RV) volume and function are important diagnostic and prognostic factors in dogs with primary or secondary right-sided heart failure. The complex shape of the right ventricle and its retrosternal position make the quantification of its volume difficult. For that reason, only few studies exist, which deal with the determination of RV volume parameters. In human medicine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is considered to be the reference technique for RV volumetric measurement (Nat Rev Cardiol 7(10):551-563, 2010), but cardiac computed tomography (CCT) and three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) are other non-invasive methods feasible for RV volume quantification. The purpose of this study was the comparison of 3DE and CCT with CMRI, the gold standard for RV volumetric quantification.

Results: 3DE showed significant lower and CCT significant higher right ventricular volumes than CMRI. Both techniques showed very good correlations (R > 0.8) with CMRI for the volumetric parameters end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV). Ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were not different when considering CCT and CMRI, whereas 3DE showed a significant higher EF and lower SV than CMRI. The 3DE values showed excellent intra-observer variability (<3%) and still acceptable inter-observer variability (<13%).

Conclusion: CCT provides an accurate image quality of the right ventricle with comparable results to the reference method CMRI. CCT overestimates the RV volumes; therefore, it is not an interchangeable method, having the disadvantage as well of needing general anaesthesia. 3DE underestimated the RV-Volumes, which could be explained by the worse image resolution. The excellent correlation between the methods indicates a close relationship between 3DE and CMRI although not directly comparable. 3DE is a promising technique for RV volumetric quantification, but further studies in awake dogs and dogs with heart disease are necessary to evaluate its usefulness in veterinary cardiology.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Midventricular short-axis of the right ventricle in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) of an anaesthetised healthy beagle. In CCT-short-axis the endocardial border is manually traced in (A) end-diastolic and (B) end-systolic volume and as in all performed methods the papillary muscles and trabeculae were included in the volumes.
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Fig4: Midventricular short-axis of the right ventricle in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) of an anaesthetised healthy beagle. In CCT-short-axis the endocardial border is manually traced in (A) end-diastolic and (B) end-systolic volume and as in all performed methods the papillary muscles and trabeculae were included in the volumes.

Mentions: Data analysis was accomplished in the Extended Brilliance Workspaceo. In order to create short-axis images, the MPRs were loaded in a Cardiac viewerp with multiplanar view modus that showed three planes of the heart: the vertical long-axis, the horizontal long-axis and the short-axis plane. Axes had to be corrected manually. The short-axis reformations were generated in both long-axes planes parallel to the tricuspid valve and perpendicular to the septum. Phases with maximum dilatation and maximum contraction were defined as end-diastole and end-systole (Figure 4). Last of all, short-axis stacks were produced covering the entire right ventricle with 16 slices, a slice thickness of 3.0 mm and an interslice gap of 3.7 – 4.1 mm (min – max). For evaluating the RV volume, the disk summation method was used. For this, the end-diastolic and the end-systolic short-axis stacks were loaded into the LV/RV Analysis softwareq. The same conditions for slice selection were applied as for CMRI. Despite the use of semi-automated border detection, manual correction was necessary.Figure 4


Quantification of right ventricular volume in dogs: a comparative study between three-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography with the reference method magnetic resonance imaging.

Sieslack AK, Dziallas P, Nolte I, Wefstaedt P, Hungerbühler SO - BMC Vet. Res. (2014)

Midventricular short-axis of the right ventricle in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) of an anaesthetised healthy beagle. In CCT-short-axis the endocardial border is manually traced in (A) end-diastolic and (B) end-systolic volume and as in all performed methods the papillary muscles and trabeculae were included in the volumes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4209227&req=5

Fig4: Midventricular short-axis of the right ventricle in cardiac computed tomography (CCT) of an anaesthetised healthy beagle. In CCT-short-axis the endocardial border is manually traced in (A) end-diastolic and (B) end-systolic volume and as in all performed methods the papillary muscles and trabeculae were included in the volumes.
Mentions: Data analysis was accomplished in the Extended Brilliance Workspaceo. In order to create short-axis images, the MPRs were loaded in a Cardiac viewerp with multiplanar view modus that showed three planes of the heart: the vertical long-axis, the horizontal long-axis and the short-axis plane. Axes had to be corrected manually. The short-axis reformations were generated in both long-axes planes parallel to the tricuspid valve and perpendicular to the septum. Phases with maximum dilatation and maximum contraction were defined as end-diastole and end-systole (Figure 4). Last of all, short-axis stacks were produced covering the entire right ventricle with 16 slices, a slice thickness of 3.0 mm and an interslice gap of 3.7 – 4.1 mm (min – max). For evaluating the RV volume, the disk summation method was used. For this, the end-diastolic and the end-systolic short-axis stacks were loaded into the LV/RV Analysis softwareq. The same conditions for slice selection were applied as for CMRI. Despite the use of semi-automated border detection, manual correction was necessary.Figure 4

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was the comparison of 3DE and CCT with CMRI, the gold standard for RV volumetric quantification. 3DE showed significant lower and CCT significant higher right ventricular volumes than CMRI.Ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were not different when considering CCT and CMRI, whereas 3DE showed a significant higher EF and lower SV than CMRI.CCT provides an accurate image quality of the right ventricle with comparable results to the reference method CMRI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Right ventricular (RV) volume and function are important diagnostic and prognostic factors in dogs with primary or secondary right-sided heart failure. The complex shape of the right ventricle and its retrosternal position make the quantification of its volume difficult. For that reason, only few studies exist, which deal with the determination of RV volume parameters. In human medicine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is considered to be the reference technique for RV volumetric measurement (Nat Rev Cardiol 7(10):551-563, 2010), but cardiac computed tomography (CCT) and three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) are other non-invasive methods feasible for RV volume quantification. The purpose of this study was the comparison of 3DE and CCT with CMRI, the gold standard for RV volumetric quantification.

Results: 3DE showed significant lower and CCT significant higher right ventricular volumes than CMRI. Both techniques showed very good correlations (R > 0.8) with CMRI for the volumetric parameters end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV). Ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were not different when considering CCT and CMRI, whereas 3DE showed a significant higher EF and lower SV than CMRI. The 3DE values showed excellent intra-observer variability (<3%) and still acceptable inter-observer variability (<13%).

Conclusion: CCT provides an accurate image quality of the right ventricle with comparable results to the reference method CMRI. CCT overestimates the RV volumes; therefore, it is not an interchangeable method, having the disadvantage as well of needing general anaesthesia. 3DE underestimated the RV-Volumes, which could be explained by the worse image resolution. The excellent correlation between the methods indicates a close relationship between 3DE and CMRI although not directly comparable. 3DE is a promising technique for RV volumetric quantification, but further studies in awake dogs and dogs with heart disease are necessary to evaluate its usefulness in veterinary cardiology.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus